See How Cold Weather Impacts Tesla Model 3

Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 19, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News TESLA MODEL 3 PERFORMANCE 10 photos Source: Electric Vehicle News Cold weather impacts every EV and ICE car, but precisely, how does the Tesla Model 3 fare?One of our most highly respected sources, Trevor Page from Model 3 Owners Club, is situated in the great white north. Trevor lives in Canada and has to deal with extreme cold weather on an almost year-round basis. He’s shared with us before about dealing with EVs in the frigid climate. Most notable is his previous take on charging and range loss in Tesla vehicles in cold temps. But, more importantly, he now has a Tesla Model 3 and he’s updated us with his observations surrounding how the cold weather may impact the EV.Related Cold-Weather Content: 33 photos In Cold Weather, Tesla Model S Vampire Drain Is Higher Than Tesla’s Claimed 1% Per Day Study Says Fast Charging Takes Longer When It’s Cold Out There’s nothing completely compelling in this video for those that know Tesla products and EVs in general. But for those electric-car rookie reservation holders, this is surely something to be considered. Keep in mind that this doesn’t just apply to the Model 3, but any EV. Batteries react to the cold and that’s important to note. However, it’s not really bad news.Let’s think for a minute here about the fact that ICE cars can’t be warmed up in your garage, there’s no true pre-heating function, and sometimes gas-powered cars refuse to even start in bitter temps. While EVs may have reduced range in cold weather, so do gas-powered cars. But regardless, there are many advantages to owning an electric car.Imagine charging at home and never having to endure the cold at a gas station! Think of a car that starts instantaneously regardless of the weather. How about even heating your cold garage with your EV and having forever warmed seats and cabin previous to ever venturing out in the elements.Let us know your thoughts and concerns in the comment section below.Video Description via Tesla Model 3 Owners Club via YouTube:Cold weather and your Model 3TESLA MODEL 3 Exclusive Interview With Tesla “Model 3 Owners Club” Founders read more

Tesla surprisingly increases range of the Model 3 with MidRange battery

first_imgSource: Charge Forward A day after decreasing the Model 3’s base price by $2,000, Tesla is also surprisingly increasing the advertised range of the cheapest version of Model 3: the Model 3 with the new Mid-Range battery pack. more…The post Tesla surprisingly increases range of the Model 3 with Mid-Range battery appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Volkswagen Plans 22 Million Electric Cars In 10 Years

first_img Electric Volkswagen Hatch Named ID.3 Source: Electric Vehicle News The boost in production expectations comes with a dramatic increase in the number of models that will be offered. Previously, it had planned on 50 different models. Now, that number is 70. They will, of course, be spread across the dozen brands it now owns, though we can expect them to be concentrated on the Volkswagen, Audi, Seat, and Škoda marques.The models will, for the most part, be based on the MEB (Modular Electric Toolkit) platform. That’s what will underlie the production forms of the VW I.D., the I.D. Crozz, and I.D. Buzz, as well as the Audi A4 e-tron, Seat el-Born, and Škoda Vision iV we just saw revealed at the Geneva Motor Show.Importantly, the company also says it is implementing a comprehensive decarbonization plan and is targeting 2050 as the date to be completely CO2-neutral. That would put it in line with the goals set out in the Paris Climate Accord.Besides its own vehicles, the Group has also stated it will offer its MEB platform to other automakers, which could create an even greater result than outlined by this announcement. So far, it has had one outfit, e.GO Mobile AG, say it will take it up on that offer, but we would not be surprised to see the previously-announced partnership with Ford eventually lead to Blue Oval MEB vehicles.While there remains some amount of skepticism out there — the dieselgate scandal is still fresh in the minds of many — we believe Volkswagen Group is now laying the redemptive groundwork necessary to be the world leader in electric automobiles in the very near future. While it does concede that Tesla owns half the market, it has its sights set on the rest.Check out the official press release below for more details.Volkswagen plans 22 million electric vehicles in ten yearsAlmost 70 new electric models by 2028 – instead of the 50 previously plannedComprehensive decarbonization program for the Volkswagen Group signed offVolkswagen Group targeting fully CO2-neutral balance by 2050Diess: “Volkswagen will change radically. We are taking on responsibility with regard to the key trends of the future – particularly in connection with climate protection.”The Volkswagen Group is forging ahead with the fundamental change of system in individual mobility and systematically aligning with electric drives. The Group is planning to launch almost 70 new electric models in the next ten years – instead of the 50 previously planned. As a result, the projected number of vehicles to be built on the Group’s electric platforms in the next decade will increase from 15 million to 22 million. Expanding e-mobility is an important building block on the road to a CO2-neutral balance. Volkswagen has signed off a comprehensive decarbonization program aimed at achieving a fully CO2-neutral balance in all areas from fleet to production to administration by 2050. Volkswagen is thus fully committed to the Paris climate targets.Dr. Herbert Diess, CEO of Volkswagen AG, said: “Volkswagen is taking on responsibility with regard to the key trends of the future – particularly in connection with climate protection. The targets of the Paris Agreement are our yardstick. We will be systematically aligning production and other stages in the value chain to CO2 neutrality in the coming years. That is how we will be making our contribution towards limiting global warming. Volkswagen is seeking to provide individual mobility for millions of people for years to come – individual mobility that is safer, cleaner and fully connected. In order to shoulder the investments needed for the electric offensive we must make further improvements in efficiency and performance in all areas.”The Volkswagen Group has set milestones in all areas to be achieved in the coming years on the road to complete decarbonization by 2050. The measures follow three principles: first, effective and sustainable CO2 reduction. Second, switch to renewable energy sources for power supply. Third, compensate for remaining emissions that cannot be avoided. In order to improve the CO2 balance of vehicles throughout their lifecycle, for example, Volkswagen has already made a start on the supply chain. A detailed roadmap is currently being drawn up. There is particularly significant potential as regards steel and aluminum supplies.The 2025 target is to reduce the CO2 footprint of the vehicle fleet by 30 percent across the lifecycle compared to 2015. Volkswagen is therefore electrifying the vehicle portfolio, with investment in this area alone amounting to more than €30 billion by 2023. The share of electric vehicles in the Group fleet is to rise to at least 40 percent by 2030. The first of the new-generation electric vehicles go into production this year: the AUDI e-tron1* will be followed by the Porsche Taycan2*. Reservations for each of these models already total 20,000 units. And electric vehicles will be brought into the mainstream with the ramp up of the Volkswagen ID. Other models in this first wave will be the ID. CROZZ, the SEAT el-born, the ŠKODA Vision E, the ID. BUZZ , and the ID. VIZZION.In order to support the electric offensive, LG Chem, SKI, CATL and Samsung were selected as strategic battery cell suppliers. In view of the constantly increasing demand, Volkswagen is also taking a close look at possible participation in battery cell manufacturing facilities in Europe. Looking further ahead, solid-state batteries also have great potential. The goal is to enable an industrial level of production with this technology together with our partner QuantumScape.At the same time, CO2 emissions at all plants are to be cut 50 percent by 2025 compared with 2010. The conversion of the power station in Wolfsburg from coal to gas will reduce CO2 emissions by 1.5 million tonnes annually from 2023 onwards. Audi’s production activities at the Brussels site, for example, are already completely CO2-neutral. The Zwickau plant will not only be the lead factory for the Modular Electric Drive Toolkit (MEB); the ID. built there will be delivered to customers with a CO2-neutral balance.The MEB lies at the heart of Volkswagen’s electric offensive. The cost of e-mobility can be significantly lowered through partnerships to enable the widest possible spread of the MEB and the associated economies of scale. That makes individual mobility affordable and usable for the mainstream in the future as well. One example of such a partnership is the planned cooperation with Aachen-based e.GO Mobile AG recently announced at the Geneva International Motor Show.To boost e-mobility further, we will be installing 400 fast-charging stations along Europe’s major roads and highways by 2020 in collaboration with industry partners in IONITY. 100 of these will be located in Germany. That means there will be a station every 120 kilometers. Elli (Electric Life), Volkswagen’s new subsidiary, will also offer wallboxes for charging at home, using green power – initially in Germany. In addition, there will be 3,500 charging points on employee car parks at all plants with further charging opportunities at dealerships. VW: All Our Electric Car Platforms Are Yours: Opens Up MEB EV To All VW Turns To Tennessee For U.S. Electric Car Production The automaker may redeem itself yet.Volkswagen Group is serious about electric vehicles. It may not look that way if you judge by its battery-powered cars on the road today — in the U.S., it currently offers only the Volkswagen e-Golf. But, its various brands will be producing millions in just a few years from now. In fact, it’s just increased its planned output from 15 million to 22 million over the next ten years. That’s ambitious by any standard.More VW news Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 12, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Tesla Autopilot stopped for a rabbit on the road caught on video

first_imgSource: Charge Forward A Tesla owner shared a dashcam video of his vehicle stopping in front of a rabbit on the road and he claims Tesla Autopilot saw the animal and initiated the maneuver to avoid hitting it. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqMH4mh99DcThe post Tesla Autopilot stopped for a rabbit on the road caught on video, owner claims appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Tesla Model Y production will create a battery shortage says Panasonic

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Tesla’s main battery supplier and partner in Gigafactory 1 says that the start of Model Y production next year will result in a battery cell shortage at the factory. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqMH4mh99DcThe post Tesla Model Y production will create a battery shortage, says Panasonic appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Iceland moving away from ICE as capital Reykjavík aims to reduce gas

first_imgThe city council of Reykjavík, Iceland recently approved a plan to reduce the number of gas stations by half in Iceland’s capital by 2025, as one of the city’s environmental initiatives. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqMH4mh99DcThe post Iceland moving away from ICE as capital Reykjavík aims to reduce gas stations by half by 2025 appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Khan hires Roach in bid to bounce back from defeat

first_imgnews Share on Twitter Share on Pinterest Khan hires Roach in bid to bounce back from defeat Share on LinkedIn Mon 22 Sep 2008 19.01 EDT Boxing Reuse this content First published on Mon 22 Sep 2008 19.01 EDT Topics Amir Khan Amir Khan has hired Freddie Roach in response to his knockout defeat by the Colombian Breidis Prescott. Photograph: Dave Thompson/PA Share on Facebook Amir Khan has hired the American trainer Freddie Roach in the wake of his 54-second knockout defeat by Breidis Prescott in Manchester this month. Khan spent the weekend at Roach’s gym in Los Angeles and, although his team remain coy about his future plans, Roach has claimed he will train the 21-year-old for his December comeback fight.Roach, who currently trains the Filipino world lightweight champion Manny Pacquiao, said: “We’re going to fight in December and he’s going to train here for six weeks for that fight.” Khan split with his trainer, Jorge Rubio, after the defeat to Prescott, although there have been suggestions from his father, Shah, that the Cuban may still have a part to play in the new setup. Khan will still need someone in his corner for his December 6 comeback because Roach has a commitment to Pacquiao, who will face Oscar De La Hoya in Las Vegas on the same night. Since you’re here…center_img Share via Email Share on Twitter This article is more than 10 years old Boxing … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Facebook This article is more than 10 years old Support The Guardian Press Association Shares00 Share on WhatsApp Share on Messenger Share via Emaillast_img read more

The US Government Bears Some Responsibility For Certain Root Causes Of Foreign

first_img FCPA Institute – Boston (Oct. 3-4) A unique two-day learning experience ideal for a diverse group of professionals seeking to elevate their FCPA knowledge and practical skills through active learning. Learn more, spend less. CLE credit is available. This post is not about the U.S. government’s two-pronged approach to fighting bribery and corruption: Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement and the DOJ’s so-called Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Initiative.Rather, this post highlights this dandy op-ed by Jay Newman recently published in the Wall Street Journal to explore a picture issue previously explored on these pages and that is whether the U.S. government bears some responsibility for certain root causes of foreign bribery and corruption.In the WSJ op-ed, Newman states:“The modern world is awash in [Al] Capones, but the most brazen don’t run brothels, guns or moonshine. They run countries. Many even get generous financial support from American taxpayers. Far from turning a blind eye to this corruption, the wealthiest countries oversee a labyrinthine system of financial institutions that inadvertently enable international crime.[…]When Western institutions drop money into the capitals of developing countries, they think themselves do-gooders. Instead they’re tools in an unprincipled scheme. Here’s how the racket works: German plumbers and New York waitresses pay taxes. Their respective governments contribute some of that money to the IMF, the World Bank and an alphabet soup of other outfits. Those groups funnel money to nations with corrupt politicians.Sure, there’s no way to track any specific dollar from the waitress’s wallet to the ruler’s pocket, but money is fungible.[…]Every dollar sent to corrupt countries also liberates local taxes for other use—or misuse. Poor farmers don’t know or care whether their new road is built with capital from a state-owned monopoly or taxes withheld from waitresses in Manhattan. But corrupt politicians do care, deeply. Paying for local infrastructure with foreign money allows them to claim credit for good works and to liberate cash for their own use.International institutions should stop funding countries with weak rule of law and endemic corruption.”There have been several FCPA enforcement actions that occurred in the context of U.S. government aid or assistance programs. (The below actions are in addition to numerous references in the FCPA’s legislative history for how the Defense Department and State Department were participants in, or at least enablers of, the conduct giving rise to the FCPA – see here for “The Story of the FCPA”).See here for an enforcement action against Venturian Corporation, along with its wholly-owned subsidiary NAPCO International, in connection with the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) program in which the U.S. government made loans to certain foreign governments to finance the purchase of defense items of U.S. origin.See here for an enforcement action against Control Systems Specialist / Darrold Crites in connection with the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) under the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) program.See here for an enforcement action against Lockheed Corp. in connection with an Egyptian contract funded by U.S. aid in the form of grant money administered by the Department of Defense under the Foreign Military Financing (FMF) program.See here for an enforcement action against Metcalf & Eddy Inc. in connection with projects in Alexandria, Egypt sponsored by the United States Agency for International Development (“USAID”).See here for an enforcement action against Richard Pitchford in connection with the The Central Asia American Enterprise Fund (“CAAEF”) – wholly funded by an appropriation of $150 million from Congress pursuant to the Support for Eastern European Democracy Act of 1989 (the “SEED Act”) and the Freedom for Russia and Emerging Eurasian Democracies and Open Market Support Act of 1992.Regarding international institutions, see here for an FCPA enforcement against World Bank employees Ramendra Basu and Gautam Sengupta in connection with a World Bank road construction project in Kenya.In addition to the above examples, in “The Uncomfortable Truths and Double Standards of Bribery Enforcement” I observed:“Not all uncomfortable truths regarding the U.S. crusade against bribery are as obvious as the U.S. government providing bags full of cash to foreign government leaders, the highest levels of the U.S. government having knowledge of and supporting private bribery, or the U.S. government not charging strategically important companies with actual FCPA violations. [T]he uncomfortable truth is sometimes a bit more subtle.[…][Various] examples raise the question of whether there is a difference between the U.S. government using public taxpayer money to offer or to pay a foreign government to induce that government to purchase U.S. company product and a company using private shareholder money to offer or pay a foreign official to induce the government to purchase its product. Similarly, why does the U.S. government construct programs around the former and call it “foreign military financing” or “foreign military sales” while criminally prosecuting the latter as bribery?As to these questions, as others have noted:“the [U.S.] government wants to give the impression that it is law-abiding and others are not when the same behavior is engaged in” by both and that “when the government itself gives bribes to foreign countries every day, every day of the week, they just call it foreign aid.”[It] has been noted: “It’s not that the United States lacks corruption . . . or even pervasive corruption. It’s just not of the low-level and petty variety like the kind [in certain emerging markets in places like Africa], not most of the time anyway. In America, corruption is concentrated at the highest levels of society—and it masquerades [under different names].[…]Bribery, however, ought to be bribery pure and simple, and subtle distinctions should not be drawn based on the source of money or influence. Doing so merely creates a distinction without a difference. Indeed, perhaps because of this uncomfortable truth regarding the U.S. crusade against bribery, U.S. government enforcement agencies frequently employ overblown and inconsistent rhetoric when describing FCPA enforcement.”As highlighted in this previous post, the notion that the U.S. government bears some responsibility for certain root causes of foreign bribery and corruption was even discussed while Congress was contemplating what would become the FCPA.As highlighted in this prior post, one of the more insightful things found in the FCPA’s extensive legislative history is an October 1975 article by Milton Gwirtzman published by the New York Times Magazine.  At this point in time, Congress was in the midst of its investigations into the so-called foreign corporate payments problem and Gwirtzman noted:“If corporate bribery abroad has offended the post-Watergate morality, the companies implicated have nevertheless taken a greater share of the blame than they deserve.  […]  The responsibility for present practices must also be shared by our Government,  which not only encouraged investment in countries whose ethical standards differ  from ours, but also in many respects set the pattern for the graft under censure today.  […]  The rapid acceleration of American private investment in foreign lands, which began in the mid-nineteen-sixties, was seen by our foreign policy makers as a welcome opportunity.  If U.S. firms could build a nation’s infrastructure, supply its consumer goods and hire a portion of its workers, the greater the likelihood the nation would be bound to ours by the safest and strongest of ties, economic self-interest.  As a result, our Government wrote the foreign investment laws of several developing countries and urged our multinationals to make use of them.  New programs were established to insure foreign investment against the risks of war and expropriation.  Embassy personnel were ordered to scout out export possibilities for American firms, which were published in Commerce Business Daily, the Government’s daily list of business opportunities.”Gwirtzman then stated as follows.  “For all these reasons, it would be unwise, as well as unfair, simply to write off bribery abroad to corporate lust.  It is a symbol of far deeper issues that really involve America’s role in the world.” Learn More & Registerlast_img read more

Once Again The DOJ Shoots Itself In The Foot

first_imgThe Department of Justice has long wanted companies to voluntarily disclose conduct that implicates the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The latest attempt to achieve this policy goal of course was the DOJ’s November 29th announcement of a new “FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy.” (This post rounds up all previous posts on this topic).Why then, literally a few hours after announcing its latest attempt to motivate companies to voluntarily disclose, did the DOJ in announcing the SBM Offshore enforcement action (see here and here for prior posts) once again (see here and here for prior similar posts) shot itself in the foot by making decisions that should result in any board member, audit committee member, or general counsel informed of current events not making the decision to voluntarily disclose?Since the April 2016 FCPA Pilot Program (another DOJ attempt to encourage voluntary disclosure), the DOJ has resolved eight corporate FCPA enforcement actions that did not originate with a true voluntary disclosure.In seven of the eight actions (SBM Offshore, Telia, Teva, JPMorgan, Embraer, Och-Ziff, and Odebrecht/Braskem) the DOJ agreed to a below-guidelines range settlement amount. (The LAN/LATAM action was resolved for a fine amount near the low-end of the guidelines range).Telia was resolved for approximately 25% below the minimum amount suggested by the guidelines; Teva was resolved for approximately 20% below the minimum amount suggested by the guidelines; JPMorgan for 25% below the minimum amount suggested by the guidelines; Embraer approximately 20% below the minimum amount suggested by the guidelines; Och-Ziff approximately 20% below the minimum amount suggested by the guidelines; and Odebrecht/Braskem approximately 15% – 20% below the minimum amount suggested by the guidelines.Moreover, all of these enforcement actions included either an NPA or DPA.As informative as these examples are, the SBM Offshore enforcement action is perhaps most informative.As highlighted in this prior post, the conduct at issue was egregious. In the words of the DOJ, the improper conduct:“lasted over 16 years, was carried out by employees at the highest level of the organization, including two high-level executives who were at times directors of a wholly-owned U.S. domestic concern, involved large bribe payments, and included deliberate efforts to conceal the scheme.”The conduct was broad in scope (involving alleged bribery schemes in Brazil, Angola, Equatorial Guinea, Kazakhstan and Iraq) and most notably the DOJ alleged that at least $180 million in corrupt “commission” payments were made to intermediaries for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business.The end result?SBM Offshore received a DPA with a settlement amount – according to the DOJ –  25% below the minimum amount suggested by the guidelines. However, as highlighted in this prior post, that figure is clearly wrong because the DOJ’s advisory sentencing guidelines sets forth a range of $4.5 billion to $9.02 billion. The DOJ did state that a $238 million settlement “is appropriate given the facts and circumstances of this case … and in consideration of imposing a penalty that will avoid substantially jeopardizing the continued viability of the Company.”In short, if I am a rational board member, audit committee member, or general counsel, I look at this “precedent” (and I use that term loosely and not in the sense of case-law precedent) the DOJ has created since the April 2016 Pilot Program and think to myself:“Why in the world should we disclose. Let’s thoroughly investigate the issues, promptly implement remedial measures, and effectively revise and enhance compliance policies and procedures – all internally and without disclosing to the enforcement agencies. In the unlikely event the DOJ finds out about the conduct, even if it is truly egregious, the DOJ is still likely to offer the company an NPA or DPA and we will still likely be able to resolve the matter for a meaningful reduction off the minimum amount suggested by the guidelines. Sure the Pilot Program and now the “FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy” may offers bigger “carrots” but those are discretionary and it is pure speculation as to whether or not this would actually happen.”As informative as the above examples are, they are not the main reason why the DOJ is shooting itself in the foot when it comes to the policy goals it sought to achieve with the Pilot Program and now the “FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy.”Consider the repeat offender FCPA enforcement actions from earlier this year involving Biomet (see here and here) and Orthofix International (see here).The first time Biomet resolved an FCPA enforcement action in March 2012, the DOJ offered the company a DPA and agreed to a settlement amount 20% below the minimum amount suggested by the guidelines. The second time Biomet resolved an FCPA enforcement in January 2017 (a portion of the improper conduct involved the same distributor in Brazil that gave rise to the 2012 FCPA enforcement action), the DOJ again offered the company a DPA and agreed to a settlement amount in the middle range of the suggested guidelines amount.The first time Orthofix resolved an FCPA enforcement action in July 2012, the DOJ offered the company a DPA and agreed to a settlement amount for the minimum amount suggested by the guidelines. When Orthofix again became the subject of FCPA scrutiny a short time later, the company stated that it “was informed that the DOJ has decided to take no further action with respect to this matter” even though the SEC brought a January 2017 FCPA enforcement action against the company. (See here).If I am that same rational board member, audit committee member, or general counsel, I look at this additional “precedent” the DOJ recently created and think to myself (in addition to the points mentioned above):“Why in the world should we disclose. Even if we resolved an FCPA enforcement action a few years ago, if additional FCPA issues arise, let’s thoroughly investigate, promptly implement remedial measures, and effectively revise and enhance compliance policies and procedures – all internally and without disclosing to the enforcement agencies. In the unlikely event the DOJ finds out about the conduct, the DOJ is again likely to offer the company a DPA and again likely to resolve the matter for something less than the top range settlement amount suggested by the guidelines.”In short, if the goal of the DOJ is to encourage corporate voluntarily disclosures, it is actually shooting itself in the foot by virtue of its recent decisions.The message seems to be clear for any board member, audit committee member, or general counsel informed of current events – do not voluntarily disclose. Learn More & Register FCPA Institute – Boston (Oct. 3-4) A unique two-day learning experience ideal for a diverse group of professionals seeking to elevate their FCPA knowledge and practical skills through active learning. Learn more, spend less. CLE credit is available.last_img read more

Acupuncture does not increase the chance of IVF success find researchers

first_img Source:https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2681194?redirect=true Mothers undergoing IVF have said that they feel more relaxed with acupuncture along with their medical procedures. The new study shows however that acupuncture did not increase the birth rates with IVF. The Australian study was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).Lead author Caroline Smith, professor of clinical research at the National Institute of Complementary Medicine and her colleagues found that acupuncture does help improve relaxation among the mothers and reduce the stress among the women who are undergoing IVF. She added that there are anecdotal studies and research that claim that acupuncture increases blood flow to the uterus and ovaries. This may in turn increase the fertility and chances of getting pregnant. She explained that this theory was proved wrong in this new study.For this study the team involved 848 women from 16 IVF centres in Australia and New Zealand. The women were aged between 18 and 42 years. Half of these women were given real acupuncture and the other half received “sham” acupuncture wherein non-invasive needles were used in places that are not acupuncture points. The needles in this case disappear within the plastic holder when pressed upon the skin and does not pierce the skin like in true acupuncture. The acupuncture session was timed when the women were given hormones to stimulate their ovulation and again after the embryos were transferred within them for conception. The women as well as the staff were all kept in the dark regarding who was getting acupuncture and who was getting a sham procedure. The main points of acupuncture used were over the abdomen, arms and legs. These are all important to reduce the stress and also stimulate the nerves of the uterus and different areas of the body. The study was conducted between June 2011 and October 2015.Related StoriesBlastocyst transfer linked to higher risk of preterm birth, large-for-gestational-age ratesChildren born via IVF more likely to develop cancer later in lifeAssisted reproductive technology solution from Olympus increases the efficiency of ICSIResults showed that little over 18.3 percent of the women who were given acupuncture became pregnant and could take a baby home compared to 17.8 percent in the sham acupuncture group. The results revealed that 25 percent of the acupuncture group conceived while 21 percent in the non-acupuncture group managed to conceive. The differences were not significant. This means that although there is a 4 percent difference, in real life this does not translate into increased chances of getting pregnant with acupuncture.Researchers agree that stress can play a role in infertility and if stress and anxiety levels are lowered with the aid of acupuncture, the chances of getting pregnant may be higher. They add however that this study is based on concrete evidence that acupuncture per se does not increase the chances of getting pregnant. Image Credit: Andrey_Popov / Shutterstockcenter_img By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDMay 16 2018According to latest research, acupuncture does not increase the chances of success with in vitro fertilization (IVF). It is a latest trend among many IVF clinics – providing acupuncture as an additional treatment along with IVF for increasing chances of success.last_img read more

New RIKEN president hopes to hold on to young stars

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) His most ambitious goal is the tenure system. He noted that most of RIKEN’s younger researchers are on fixed-term assignments that typically run 5 years. This has skewed research toward short-term results, as scientists burnish resumes for their next job hunt. Hopping from one short-term appointment to another, he said, “creates a very difficult situation for young researchers.”A related problem, Matsumoto said, is that few young Japanese researchers are gaining overseas experience, because “they worry they won’t be able to find a post when they return.” He intends to create formal exchange programs, perhaps with counterparts like the Max Planck Society of Germany, to send young Japanese abroad and bring in more foreign researchers who could circulate in Japan to build collaborations and make RIKEN a more important player globally. He said he will push RIKEN scientists and administrators to routinely use English. And he hopes to address other long-standing bureaucratic barriers by allowing research funds to carry over from one budget year to the next and making it easy for labs to hire technicians. “Our researchers are very busy but their support staff is very limited,” he said.These initiatives will take time. Introducing tenure, for example, “will be very difficult,” he said, because it will require new personnel practices. One constraint is money: RIKEN’s 2015 budget is set. Matsumoto said he will flesh out specifics of his reforms in next year’s budget, which starts in April 2016. Seven weeks into his presidency of RIKEN, Hiroshi Matsumoto at a press conference on Friday outlined his strategy for restoring luster to the scandal-tarnished network of national laboratories. His big new idea: introducing a tenure track system that would retain the best young researchers now on temporary contracts at RIKEN.Matsumoto’s overriding task is to help RIKEN recover from last year’s debacle. A high-profile paper reporting a new way of creating stem cells, dubbed stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency (STAP), proved bogus after a series of investigations. The fiasco led to the suicide of a senior scientist and the restructuring of RIKEN’s Center for Developmental Biology.A specialist in magnetic fields and space plasma, Matsumoto had spent his entire career at Kyoto University and served as its president from 2008 to 2014. Since taking the helm at RIKEN on 1 April, Matsumoto has visited all of RIKEN’s 15 major facilities, meeting leaders and young researchers to listen to their concerns. He presented his “Initiative for Scientific Excellence” on 22 May here at the RIKEN headquarters near Tokyo.center_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

The 5minute journal submission

first_img“The submission process is usually a nightmare of torture and torment. It’s simply not necessary,” says Michael Lederman, the founder and editor-in-chief of the new journal, Pathogens & Immunity. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email There’s no shortage of places to publish original research papers about pathogens and immunity, but a new peer-reviewed journal on those topics has a unique author-friendly mandate: to reduce the submission process to a matter of minutes, and initial reviews to just a few days.In related news, the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York also announced today a similar attempt to simplify submissions to nine peer-reviewed journals. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Lederman, an immunologist at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, promises that the journal’s online submission process only takes 5 minutes. And, unlike other journals, it will accept any format approved by the National Library of Medicine. The editors will only request reformatting upon acceptance of a paper.That should avoid wasted effort, Lederman says. “People typically try to get into the highest impact journals first, and if they don’t succeed, they have to reformat,” he says. He ticks off a long list of top-tier journals in his field that have different formats: Science, Cell, Nature, The Journal of Clinical Investigation, The Journal of Experimental Medicine. “You can spend a day or two reformatting,” he says.Pathogens & Immunity, which has just started to accept submissions, has “reasonable flexibility” about the length of the papers, he adds. Authors don’t have to sign lengthy documents, and they’re welcome to include reviews from other journals and their responses. Senior editors will decide within 4 days whether to send a paper out for review.“I think the idea is brilliant,” says Steven Deeks, an HIV/AIDS researcher at the University of California, San Francisco, who agreed to serve as an associate editor of the journal. “It makes publishing a joy.”Deeks and the other associate editors will serve as reviewers, and the journal will take another unusual step and pay them $50 for evaluating submissions. “I don’t like the idea of working for free,” Lederman says. “I don’t like publication houses using the insecurity of me and my colleagues to maintain their businesses.”The journal’s startup is funded by a small portion of an $18.5 million grant that Lederman and his colleague Leonard Calabrese received from the Richard J. Fasenmyer Foundation, primarily to support their HIV/AIDS research.Lederman does not want to create The Journal of Last Resort, and vows to only accept papers about interesting immunology and infectious diseases—his original title for the online, open-access publication.“Is there a need for another journal on these topics?” Lederman asks. “No. Is there a need for a journal that’s really friendly to researchers? Absolutely. And if we can do it better than the crop that exists, maybe others will modify their style a bit.”If all goes well, the first issue will appear in July.In a similar attempt to simplify submissions, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory announced today that papers uploaded to its biology preprint server, bioRXiv—which are only screened for offensive or nonscientific content—now can be directly transferred to nine peer-reviewed journals for consideration.The collaborating publications are the Biophysical Journal, eLife, The EMBO Journal, EMBO Molecular Medicine, EMBO Reports, G3:Genes/Genomes/Genetics, Genetics, Genome Research, and Molecular Systems Biology. The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences  is expected to join the collaboration soon.last_img read more

Shocking unification reduces a lot of tough physics problems to just one

first_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country It’s the sort of physics advance that Sauron might appreciate. The villain in J. R. R. Tolkien’s fantasy trilogy, The Lord of the Rings, gives the kings of men, elves, and dwarves magic rings, but then forges a single ring that controls all the others. In a similar way, a duo of theoretical physicists has come up with a way to transform all the disparate members of a vast family of complex systems known as spin models into different shades of a single simple model, which now serves as the one to rule them all.That “Ising model” is the simplest spin model and already has a legendary history. The advance could have implications well beyond physics, as spin models have been used to simulate everything from stock markets to protein folding. “I find it pretty shocking,” says David Perez, a mathematician at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), who was not involved with the work. “What is surprising is not that there is a universal model, but that it is so simple.”Spin models were invented to explain magnetic materials, such as iron and nickel. Those metals can be magnetized because each of their atoms acts like a tiny bar magnet. At high temperatures, the jiggling atoms point in random directions and their magnetic fields cancel one another. However, below the so-called Curie temperature, the material undergoes a “phase transition” much like water freezing into ice, and all the atoms suddenly point in the same direction. That alignment reduces the atoms’ total energy and makes their magnetic fields add together. Because each atom’s magnetism originates from the spin of an unpaired electron within it, models of how magnetism arises are known as spin models. The Ising model was the first spin model, invented in 1920 by German physicist Wilhelm Lenz, who gave it to his student Ernst Ising to analyze. In it, each atom is a simple object that can point either up or down. Each spin flips randomly with thermal energy, but it interacts with its neighbors so that each pair of spins can lower its energy by pointing in the same direction. Each spin can also lower its energy by aligning with an externally applied magnetic field. The coupling between each pair of spins can be different, as can be the external field applied to each spin.Ising hoped to show that below a certain temperature the spins would undergo a magnetic phase transition. However, he could “solve” only the 1D Ising model—a single string of spins—and found it had no phase transition. Ising speculated that the 2- and 3D cases wouldn’t, either. Then in 1944 the enigmatic Norwegian-American chemist Lars Onsager solved the Ising model with uniform couplings and no external fields on a 2D square pattern of spin. The famously incomprehensible Onsager, who won the 1968 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for earlier work but also lost two faculty jobs, showed that the 2D Ising model does have a phase transition—the first seen in a theoretical model. Onsager’s tour de force calculation is now legendary, although he published it only 2 years after the fact. The 3D Ising model is still unsolved.Meanwhile, spurred in part by Ising’s difficulties, physicists invented plenty of other spin models. Instead of up and down, the spins can have, say, five possible settings, or like compass needles can point in any direction. The spins might also interact in groups larger than pairs and with spins far beyond their neighbors. Spin models have found use outside physics. For example, the spread of an epidemic might be simulated on a spin model with spins having three states corresponding to well, sick, and recovered. “Spin model is a really bad name for something that’s a lot more general,” says Gemma De las Cuevas, a theoretical physicist at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching, Germany.But all those disparate spin models can be transformed into the good old 2D Ising model, De las Cuevas and Toby Cubitt, a theorist of University College London, report online today in Science. Crudely their proof works as follows. First, the two scientists note that the up-or-down Ising spin resembles the true-or-false character of a logical statement such as “the car is white.” They then prove that any particular 2D Ising model—i.e., with a particular set of coupling and external fields — is equivalent to an instance of a logical problem called the satisfiability, or SAT, problem, in which the goal is to come up with a set of logical statements, A,B,C, … that satisfy a long logical formula such as “A and not (B or C) …” The theorists present a way to map the SAT problem onto the 2D Ising model.Next, they show how any other spin model can also be translated into a SAT problem. That SAT problem can then be translated onto the 2D Ising model, thus making the two spin models equivalent. There is a price to pay, however. The 2D Ising model must have more spins than the original spin model. But De las Cuevas says that the computational demands of the Ising model are only modestly bigger than those of the original model. “If you could explain all of the parameter regions of the 2D Ising model with fields, that would be equivalent to probing all possible spin models,” she says.That’s a big “if.” Although Onsager solved the 2D Ising model with uniform couplings and no external fields, the general problem with nonuniform couplings and external fields remains unsolved and is among the most computationally demanding problems there is—with the number of computational steps exploding exponentially with the number of spins. “It’s surprising that you can map any model onto this simple model,” says Miguel Angel Martin-Delgado, a theoretical physicist at UCM. “But you can take the other side, which is that this simple-seeming model is as complex as any other.”De las Cuevas agrees and says that the value of the advance may come in practical computations. It provides a recipe for translating any spin model, no matter how baroque, into a 2D Ising model, with the complexity of the original model encoded in the couplings between the Ising spins and the magnetic fields. If that recipe can be optimized, then it may be easier to simulate on a computer the Ising model instead of the original model, De las Cuevas says. “I think there’s a lot of room for thinking, ‘Hey, now I can study this model that I couldn’t before, using this universal model.'”The advance might also make into the textbooks. The Ising model is introduced in statistical mechanics courses as the simplest spin model. Future texts might also note that in spite of its simplicity, it can reproduce all other spin models. In a sense, it’s all you need to know.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

A halfbilliondollar bid to develop vaccines against the next viral threat

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Lam Yik Fei/Contributor/Getty Images A half-billion-dollar bid to develop vaccines against the next viral threat Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A patient arrives in an isolation ward during a 2014 outbreak of deadly Lassa fever in Sierra Leone.  A coalition that aims to develop new vaccines for emerging infectious diseases has nearly half a billion dollars in its coffers and its first three diseases in its sights.Over the next 5 years, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) plans to bankroll the development of vaccines against three viral threats—Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-coronavirus, Lassa, and Nipah—so that small outbreaks never get a chance to become raging epidemics. Formed last year without serious funding, CEPI has received $100 million commitments from the Wellcome Trust and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the governments of Japan, Germany, and Norway have pledged to contribute an additional $260 million. As Science went to press, CEPI planned to announce the commitments at the World Economic Forum this week in Davos, Switzerland.Epidemiologist John-Arne Røttingen, CEPI’s interim president through 2017, says he hopes more countries will now contribute. “CEPI is a collective function, and it’s a premium they need to pay for global health security,” says Røttingen, who is based in Oslo.center_img By Jon CohenJan. 18, 2017 , 5:15 PM Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The devastating Ebola epidemic that erupted in West Africa in 2014 sparked the formation of CEPI. Experimental Ebola vaccines, which have no commercial market, were sitting in laboratory freezers when the epidemic broke out, but they had never been tested in humans. Clinical trials began in haste in September 2014, but vaccine development is a multiphase process that requires first conducting small-scale studies for safety and immune responses in hundreds of people who are not at risk for the disease. Vaccines that pass those tests move on to real-world efficacy trials in thousands of volunteers. By the time an Ebola vaccine proved its worth in July 2015, standard containment efforts had already nearly brought the epidemic to a standstill.Jeremy Farrar, head of the Wellcome Trust in London, co-authored an influential perspective in the 23 July 2015 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine that spelled out the need for a coordinated global effort to help advance vaccines against menacing infectious diseases that industry ignored because of dodgy markets. The article proposed taking novel vaccines through preliminary human testing before the inevitable outbreaks—an idea that has now evolved into CEPI. “We now have enough money to show the world that this can deliver,” says Farrar, who is on the interim CEPI board.CEPI will now solicit proposals from academic researchers and industry to develop candidate vaccines for its three target viruses. In 5 years, it aims to take two vaccines for each virus through early human studies so that they’re in the wings and ready for a real-world test as soon as one of these viruses surfaces again. CEPI also intends to fund vaccine “platforms”—technologies like messenger RNA or harmless viral vectors that can serve as backbones for a variety of vaccines.CEPI chose its first targets after analyzing the public health impact of several diseases on a priority list assembled by the World Health Organization in 2016. All three are serious threats: Respiratory illness caused by MERS continues to haunt the Middle East, Lassa fever causes life-threatening hemorrhagic illness in West Africa, and Nipah virus in Asia leads to brain inflammation with a high mortality. Vaccines for all are lacking, but CEPI’s scientific advisers believe they do not present any obvious technical obstacles and are within reach.The U.S. government, one of the world’s largest investors in vaccines against emerging infectious diseases, has yet to commit anything to CEPI, but Røttingen says he’ll try again now that the U.S. presidential election is over. In the meantime, he says, CEPI has “a very strong collaboration and compact” with U.S. agencies including the National Institutes of Health (NIH). “I cannot give them money, but I’m very interested in collaborating when they do trials of vaccines,” says Anthony Fauci, head of NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland. “They’ll get in-kind contributions from us. And the half-billion they roll out at Davos will attract other donors.”By the end of 2017, CEPI aims to raise a total of $1 billion, needed to fully fund its first 5 years. “There are as many as 50 pathogens that could emerge, and we’d like CEPI to be so successful that 10 or 20 years from now, we’ll have a vaccine for every one of them,” Farrar says. But for now, he says it’s crucial to prove that it can be done with the first three targets. “You’ll do more than just produce three vaccines,” Farrar says. “You’ll transform the way we think about vaccines and the pipeline.”last_img read more

Podcast Recognizing the monkey in the mirror giving people malaria parasites as

first_imgThis week, we chat about what it means if a monkey can learn to recognize itself in a mirror, injecting people with live malaria parasites as a vaccine strategy, and insect-inspired wind turbines with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Joleah Lamb joins Alexa Billow to discuss how seagrass can greatly reduce harmful microbes in the ocean—protecting people and corals from disease. Read the research.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: peters99/iStock; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img

A new way to engage kids Science museum teams with local school

first_imgThis youngster seems eager to explore his new surroundings. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Frankie SchembriAug. 29, 2018 , 9:00 AM But those early childhood education providers often have little expertise in science. Hosting prekindergarten classrooms in science museums could be a model for improving early science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education for all young children, says Ellen Frede of the National Institute for Early Education Research at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey.Before hosting the children, Carnegie retrofitted space to meet the national standards for Head Start classrooms, creating a designated outdoor play area and a space for food preparation, Brown says. Educators from the museum and the Pittsburgh schools also met monthly from January to August to develop two STEM-focused units that would take advantage of existing exhibits and other museum resources. The renovations and professional development were funded with a $200,000 grant from the Pittsburgh-based Heinz Endowments.Frede calls the collaboration a “brilliant” way to engage children at a deeper level, which research has shown can yield lasting academic benefits. She also applauds the steps taken to prepare teachers for the new classroom. “Teachers need more robust curriculum models to follow, more resources to execute the activities in those curricula, and better training to help them become comfortable teaching STEM in their classes,” she says.Museums thinking about hosting an early childhood classroom should also assess whether their exhibits are appropriate for preschool children, Frede says. If not, a 3-year-old may resort to “a lot of trial and error, like button pushing and lever pulling,” interactions that makes it harder for them to engage with the materials.Nearly all museums do some form of outreach with local school districts, says Todd Happer of the Association of Science-Technology Centers, a nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C. A few also house their own private preschool classrooms, such as the Orlando Science Center in Florida and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Happer speculates that the cost of retrofitting space to meet Head Start standards may be the biggest roadblock. “Hopefully, the partnership in Pittsburgh will get the ball rolling,” he adds.Brown believes the early childhood classroom partnerships offer a “tremendous opportunity” to learn about what works with young children. “One facet of our core mission is supporting formal education in creating a next generation of scientists, technologists, and critical thinkers,” he says. “It’s hard to think of a better way to do that.”*Correction, 31 August, 1 p.m.: This story has been updated to make clear that the classroom at the Carnegie Science Center is not the first early learning classroom at a U.S. science center. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Pittsburgh Public Schools center_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A new way to engage kids? Science museum teams with local school district to educate preschoolers The 20 3- and 4-year-olds who came to the Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, last week weren’t simply on a field trip. Instead, they were the first participants in a yearround preschool program run in conjunction with the Pittsburgh public schools.Carnegie’s decision to host a public preschool classroom reflects a growing interest by museums to extend their reach to a cohort of previously underserved prekindergarten children. “We had the space available, and it seemed like a natural next step in our partnership,” says Jason Brown, the museum’s senior director of science and education. A similar partnership has been operating between the Science Center of Iowa and Des Moines Public Schools for several years. Some of the children in the class are part of Head Start, a U.S. government–funded program that annually provides educational, health, and social services to nearly 1 million young children from low-income families and those with disabilities. Its classrooms and those for other preschool programs are typically located in schools, community centers, and religious buildings.last_img read more

For these intrepid crickets Hawaiis lava is home sweet home

first_img USGS/POLARIS/NEWSCOM For these intrepid crickets, Hawaii’s lava is home sweet home The lava cricket sustains itself on sea foam and wind-blown plant remains. The lava from the 2018 Kilauea eruption has cooled but still offers little to sustain plants or animals. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Last year, when the simmering Kilauea volcano had its most violent eruption in decades, massive molten rivers of lava slithered across a corner of the Big Island of Hawaii, swallowing up roads and parked cars, houses and meadows, even a boat marina. As the lava gradually cooled over the next few months, it left behind jet-black tendrils of lifeless, lumpy terra nova. For one tiny, unassuming Hawaiian native, however, all this destruction meant one thing: fresh real estate.The lava cricket, Caconemobius fori—’ūhini nēnē pele in Hawaiian—is, according to many biologists, the first multicellular life form to take up residence on new Hawaiian lava flows. How this poorly understood insect manages to thrive in a harsh, sterile landscape when virtually nothing else can is a mystery. This week, scientists are heading out to Kilauea’s latest lava fields in hopes of learning the cricket’s secrets. The answers may rewrite the rules on which adaptations make an animal a good pioneer.Marlene Zuk, an entomologist at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul who is leading the first extensive study of these crickets in decades, concedes that they seem unimpressive next to the dramatic geology. “There’s the lava and the scape of this barren land, and then there’s this cricket.” By Michael PriceMar. 20, 2019 , 12:50 PM ALAN CRESSLER/FLICKR When Kilauea erupted last year, Zuk remembered Howarth’s work and realized it was the perfect opportunity to finally learn more about the enigmatic lava crickets. The National Science Foundation green-lighted her application for one of its rapid-response grants, designed to fund research triggered by sudden events such as hurricanes.Zuk calls the lava crickets “unlikely colonists” because they lack the features biologists have come to expect from species that lead the charge into new environments. Rosemary Gillespie, an evolutionary ecologist at the University of California, Berkeley, explains that such animal front-runners are usually generalists, able to live almost anywhere. They tend to be highly mobile, able to fly or float over great distances. And they tend to breed easily and quickly.None of this describes the lava cricket. It isn’t a generalist; it has been found only on young lava flows. It lacks wings and can’t fly. And without wings, it can’t sing, which raises another question: How do males find a mate?When the crickets do mate, a gruesome habit presents a further challenge to survival. While copulating, the female sucks a bloodlike fluid called hemolin from the male’s leg, giving their potential progeny a nutritious leg-up. He can lose 3% to 8% of his body mass during the ordeal. “It’s extremely hot and dry [on recent lava fields] … so donating any kind of fluid is probably a pretty substantial cost for the males to bear,” says Justa Heinen-Kay, a postdoctoral entomologist in Zuk’s lab.These conditions might even contribute to a rather rare evolutionary scenario, says Jeremy Marshall, a cricket researcher at Kansas State University in Manhattan. “Usually when we think about who is choosy, it’s females of a species,” he says. “But if mating is going to be even more costly for males, we might get a situation in which … we’d expect to see the opposite, for males to become the choosy ones driving sexual selection.”When Zuk and Heinen-Kay visit Kilauea’s recent lava flows this week and later this summer, they will be armed with time-tested traps of wine bottles and raw cheese and some new questions. They’re hoping to find out, for instance, whether the insects possess some novel type of chemical signaling that allows them to follow and find each other in the lava cracks. They will also try to determine whether these crickets congregate in groups or are solo explorers. Finally, they would like to catch some pregnant females to start a colony back at their lab.Whatever strategies these lava crickets are employing to become the initial colonizers of one of the most extreme environments on Earth are likely to surprise biologists, Zuk says. Either these crickets share some as-yet-unknown attributes of animals like cockroaches or our ideas about what make for a good early colonist are wrong, she says. “Either way, it’s going to be a really exciting insight into adaptation.” Hawaiian locals had long observed that in the wake of eruptions, ‘ūhini nēnē pele was quick to appear on the scene, but the species wasn’t formally described by scientists and given its Linnaean name until 1978. Four years earlier, a group led by entomologist Frank Howarth of Honolulu’s Bishop Museum was out exploring Kilauea’s lava fields when it spotted the crickets. Lacking formal traps, the group baited empty wine bottles with bits of “rancid raw cheese.” The improvised pitfalls snared 153 crickets over the course of 6 days.Howarth and company learned the crickets show up on barren lava flows that had erupted as recently as 3 months earlier, before practically any other living thing. The insects eke out an austere existence by eating decaying plants that blow in with the wind and slurping sea foam, which contains a proteinaceous compound called albumen. By the time vegetation starts to grow, the crickets disappear. “If the plants have already moved in, it’s too late to find them,” Zuk says. No one knows where they live between eruptions. 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