World Cup 2015: Ireland 16-9 Italy

first_img TAGS: Highlight Ireland faced their biggest test of the World Cup to date at the Olympic Stadium and will be relieved to have recorded a victory, particularly as they played the last eight minutes against Italy with 14 men. The Italians were much improved from the team that struggled to beat Canada last weekend, disrupting Ireland at the scrum and the breakdown. They also defended extremely well, negating the threat of Ireland’s driving maul and closing down their back-line moves. As was always expected, the winners of Pool D will be decided when Ireland face France in Cardiff on Sunday.WHAT’S HOTBack-row bruisers – There’s plenty of talent in the back rows of both these teams and they put it on show. Sergio Parisse may dominate the headlines for Italy and he’s a real talisman, but Simone Favaro was equally as influential in this game, albeit for the less flashy stuff – making his tackles and winning turnovers. Francesco Minto topped the tackle charts with 16 too. For Ireland, there were a few powerful surges from Sean O’Brien and Jamie Heaslip as well as the try-saving tackle by Peter O’Mahony on Josh Furno. O’Mahony’s physicality got the better of him late in the second half, though, when he was sin-binned for charging into a ruck with his shoulder.Iain Henderson – He’s been in this column before and he no doubt will be again. The Ulster lock has fast established himself as a key member of Ireland’s team with his all-action displays. Athletic is a fitting word do describe Henderson’s performance in a game at the Olympic Stadium. He fits the bill in the tight and the loose – rampaging with ball in hand, strong in defence, solid at the set-piece and he even charged down a Tommaso Allan kick too.Green is the colour: Ireland fans donned patriotic clothing at the Italy game. Photo: Getty ImagesShow of colour – As expected, green was the dominant colour in the Olympic Stadium stands but a few specific fans deserve a mention. First, there was the gent donned in a green suit, the material’s pattern featuring many a clover. Then there were the two young fans who’d died their hair green for the match. Finally, we have to applaud the four England fans bedecked in white shirts and St George’s flags, and some Roman headgear. England may be out of the World Cup, but their supporters are still enjoying the tournament and rightly so.Smart Sexton – It didn’t go all the fly-half’s way in this game and he didn’t dictate play as he did against Canada in the opening game, but Johnny Sexton‘s inside passes allowed Ireland to get over the gain-line and in the last ten minutes he kicked to the corners superbly to keep Italy pinned in their own half.WHAT’S NOTItaly’s lineout – They may have had the edge at the scrum and defended Ireland’s driving maul expertly, but their own lineout was a mess. In the first half, three successive lineouts were stolen by Ireland – two of those because of overthrows from hooker Andrea Manici and it was little wonder he was replaced at the break. Such errors meant they simply put the pressure back on themselves.High jump: Italy win a lineout late on but they struggled in the first half. Photo: Getty ImagesSexist commentary – Have to say, Dan Lobb’s comment about Italy having the most attractive fans in the tournament while the camera panned to some young women in the crowd during the in-stadium ‘entertainment’ grated with this particular journalist. Surely there’s something more worthwhile and relevant to focus on in the build-up.STATISTICS10 – The number of offloads made by Italy, double the number made by Ireland. Attendance: 53,187For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 20 – The number of tackles missed by Italy, double the number missed by Ireland.4 – The number of lineouts stolen by Ireland.Centre of attention: Keith Earls scores a first-half try against the Italians. Photo: Getty ImagesIreland: S Zebo; T Bowe, K Earls (L Fitzgerald 76), R Henshaw, D Kearney; J Sexton, C Murray; J McGrath (C Healy 59), R Best (S Cronin 70), M Ross (N White 59), I Henderson (D Toner 67), P O’Connell (capt), P O’Mahony, S O’Brien (C Henry 67), J Heaslip.Try: Earls. Con: Sexton. Pens: Sexton 3. Yellow card: O’Mahony (72).Italy: L McLean; L Sarto, M Capagnaro, G Garcia (T Benvenuti 3), G Venditti; T Allan (C Canna 65), E Gori (G Palazzani 76); M Aguero (M Rizzo 62, Aguero 73), A Manici (D Giazzon ht), L Cittadini (D Chistolini 62), Q Geldenhuys, J Furno, F Minto, S Favaro (M Bergamasco 67), S Parisse (capt, A Zanni 65).Pens: Allan 3.Referee: Jerome Garces (France)Man of the Match: Iain Henderson. A full review of the World Cup match between Ireland and Italy at the Olympic Stadium All arms and legs: Robbie Henshaw is tackled by Simone Favaro at the Olympic Stadium. Photo: Getty Images last_img read more

Six Nations: Wales 16-21 England

first_imgThe good and the bad of England’s Six Nations win over Wales LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Red wall: Nathan Hughes tries to fend off Jonathan Davies and Rhys Webb. Photo: Getty ImagesHook crook – At scrum time, it seemed Wales were looking to drive England back to secure possession rather than hooking it. This was not a successful tactic, especially as England sometimes got the nudge on Wales up front. Unless they know they can overpower the opposition pack, Wales need to look at hooking the ball to ensure they retain possession on their own feed at scrum time.Over time: Liam Williams scores from a pre-planned move in the first half. Photo: Getty ImagesBoo boys – As said above, the passion of the crowd was superb, but two cases were not. First, there was no need for the booing of the English anthem – whether it be for God Save The Queen itself or the appearance of Dylan Hartley on the big screen. And the whistling that accompanied every English kick at goal was also unnecessary.STATISTICS20 – Number of tackles made by Man of the Match Joe Launchbury. Justin Tipuric and Sam Warburton were joint top for Wales with 18.8 – Number of turnovers won by Wales compared to 2 by England.22 – Number of ball carries made by Nathan Hughes, who also topped England’s metres made chart with 67.12 – Number of offloads made by England, three times as many as Wales.Wales: L Halfpenny; G North, J Davies, S Williams (J Roberts 71), L Williams; D Biggar, R Webb (G Davies 65); R Evans (N Smith 53), K Owens (S Baldwin 61), T Francis (S Lee 53), J Ball, AW Jones (capt), S Warburton, J Tipuric, R Moriarty (T Faletau 53).Try: L Williams. Con: Halfpenny. Pens: Halfpenny 2.England: M Brown; J Nowell (J May 71), J Joseph (B Te’o 65), O Farrell, E Daly; G Ford, B Youngs (D Care 65); J Marler (M Mullan 71), D Hartley (capt, J George 47), D Cole (K Sinckler 71), J Launchbury, C Lawes, M Itoje, J Clifford (J Haskell 49), N Hughes. TAGS: Highlight Corner stop: Elliot Daly scores the winning try in the closing minutes in Cardiff. Photo: Getty Images Tries: Youngs, Daly. Con: Farrell. Pens: Farrell 3.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Elliot Daly’s 77th-minute try meant England took their winning run to 16 Tests. It was a hugely physical match played at a ferocious pace against a Wales side showing their best form for many a month, so this will chart as one of the best victories of Eddie Jones’s reign.Both sides defended resolutely as the opposition maintained possession for numerous phases, Ben Youngs getting the first try before Liam Williams crossed to give Wales a half-time lead. The Welsh looked to be closing in on a famous win over England until a clearance kick was fielded by George Ford and fed to Owen Farrell, who released Daly down the wing. Daly showed the pace to beat Alex Cuthbert on the outside and as England closed out another victory – they do say winning is a habit – Wales had to settle for a losing bonus point.Here’s our verdict on the match…WHAT’S HOTPatience is a virtue – England went through 26 phases in the build-up to Ben Youngs’s first-half try. Left to right, forward and back, they stretched the Welsh defence across the pitch, didn’t panic when they couldn’t get across the whitewash despite numerous close encounters and three minutes later Youngs darted over from the back of a ruck.Ben strikes: England celebrate Ben Youngs’s try after 26 phases. Photo: Getty ImagesWales, too, put together some brilliant phase play, and while it was a pre-planned move from the back of a scrum that sent Liam Williams careering over the line, the pressure they had put England under beforehand created that opportunity.We may be living in times when instant gratification is the order of the day, but sometimes patience can bring the best rewards.Cool captaincy – Talk of who will be Lions skipper will be dominating rugby conversations until Warren Gatland announces his decision on 17 April. Alun Wyn Jones is one of the favourites and I should make clear here that he would be my choice to lead the team in New Zealand this summer, his form this season as good as its ever been.Leading man: Alun Wyn Jones during the anthems. Photo: Getty ImagesThat’s probably why I’m going to share this anecdote. After Wales had taken the lead in the first half through Liam Williams’s try, Jones was the first to run back to his own half and as the rest of the team gathered for the restart he was using his words and actions to ensure they calmed down and focused on the next play. It was cool and collected leadership – exactly what will be needed in New Zealand.Red-hot atmosphere – There was a cacophony of noise in the Principality Stadium. Wales v England games are always special and this time it felt like there was an ever sharper edge to proceedings, perhaps down to all the goings-on off the field during the week. It wasn’t just points on the board being cheered, it was big hits and smart skills. When a group of English supporters started belting out Swing Low Sweet Chariot, the home fans hit back with ‘Wales, Wales, Wales’ to drown them out. It was the kind of atmosphere that makes Test-match rugby so special, with the action on the field matching the enthusiasm off it – more of the same throughout this Six Nations please.Fans-tastic: England and Wales supporters en route to the Principality Stadium. Photo: Getty ImagesWHAT’S NOTBilly miss – There is only one Billy Vunipola. He has an innate ability to break tackles and get across the gain-line with his sheer power. This is not the strength of Nathan Hughes; his talent is taking the contact, staying upright and getting offloads away to his team-mates. England seem to be keen on Hughes playing like Vunipola rather than using his own strengths – and it wasn’t a success. He was hit hard by the Welsh defence when he tried to make a bust and was driven back when within a couple of metres of the line in the lead-up to the Ben Youngs’s try. Had Billy been on the pitch you suspect the try would have come then. If Hughes is wearing the No 8 shirt, let him play his natural game, not try to impersonate another’s.last_img read more

England beat France in extra-time to lift Autumn Nations Cup

first_img Champions: England captain Owen Farrell lifts the Autumn Nations Cup (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. England beat France in extra-time to lift Autumn Nations CupEddie Jones insisted during the build-up to this Autumn Nations Cup final that England would not underestimate France, that they knew how dangerous young French teams could be, that their preparation had been “first class”.Yet England still seemed tentative for long periods and it took an Owen Farrell penalty in the 16th minute of extra-time to avoid bookending the year with defeats by the French.Jones said to BBC Radio 5Live afterwards: “We want to be chasing pressure down the street and at the moment pressure is chasing us down the street.” His side may have shown resilience and resolve to eventually get the victory, but there are still question marks over their style and mindset. England were expected to comfortably beat a team that had fewer caps combined than four of their players had as individuals, but they needed an 80th-minute try from Luke Cowan-Dickie, converted by Farrell, to even take the game into extra-time as this France team defied predictions to not only give the hosts a stern test as they matched their physicality but come within a minute of lifting the trophy themselves. 1000 – Owen Farrell has become only the sixth man to record 1,000 points in Test rugby, joining Dan Carter, Jonny Wilkinson, Neil Jenkins, Ronan O’Gara & Diego Dominguez in reaching that milestone. Elite. pic.twitter.com/UCyCkJ8Ian— OptaJonny (@OptaJonny) December 6, 2020The 2,000 supporters who had been welcomed back into Twickenham may not have been enthralled by a match that saw 36% of possession kicked and only two line breaks – there were periods when it was as silent as a game behind closed doors – but they did get an additional 16 minutes of action and the drama of a ‘golden point’ period.England had a chance to win the game in the second minute of extra-time but Farrell hit the post with that penalty – one of four he missed over the course of the Test.He put the ball through the posts when given another opportunity – Maro Itoje winning the crucial penalty at the breakdown – and then lifted the Autumn Nations Cup just a few weeks after holding aloft the Six Nations trophy. They went in at the break leading 13-6 having repelled England for double-figure phases on the line. It was that period that highlighted a dearth of creativity from the hosts as they tried – and ultimately failed – to pummel their way over when there was space out wide.A French error in kicking the ball out after it had been carried back into their 22 had handed England a lineout seven metres from the line. Itoje won the ball and immediately fed Tom Curry, who surged towards the line. A quick recycle and Henry Slade then cut a powerful line to get within a couple of metres of the line.Then it was wave after wave of pick-and-goes from England but they simply couldn’t find a crack in the blue wall built by Shaun Edwards.Fine line: George Ford is held up on the line just before half-time (Getty Images)It came out to the backs once and George Ford had to cut back inside as Gabin Villiere read the move well; the fly-half was held up on the line, so then came more close-range surges from the forwards until Ellis Genge lost the ball under the posts.England were then a little too eager to pressurise a French scrum five metres from their line and conceded a free-kick that allowed France to go into the changing rooms ahead.The difference in the scoreline was a Brice Dulin try created by Matthieu Jalibert, who dummied inside Owen Farrell and beat a Jamie George tackle to then throw a long pass to his full-back. Owen Farrell penalty secures 22-19 victory in final at Twickenham LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS FRENCH 𝐅𝐋𝐀𝐈𝐑 Brice Dulin shocks @englandrugby fans and slides over for the visitors Watch #ENGvFRA live on #PrimeVideo pic.twitter.com/FrdI48T34S— Amazon Prime Video Sport (@primevideosport) December 6, 2020England dominated possession and territory in the second period, opting to run a little more often, but they were not able to break down a highly motivated French defence until that Cowan-Dckie try from a driving maul in the final minute.The extra-time element added a dose of drama to the end of a match that had failed to ignite into a spectacle – and at least England got to lift this trophy in front of fans. When needed most, Owen Farrell delivers The @EnglandRugby skipper scores in sudden death extra time to win the Autumn Nations Cup! #ENGvFRA pic.twitter.com/1IIWHEVfpO— Amazon Prime Video Sport (@primevideosport) December 6, 2020Arguably the most imagination seen by any Englishmen at Twickenham was the groundsmen wearing Santa hats when they took the field at half-time. And at that point it looked like the French, with Cameron Woki particularly impressive, might pull off a big upset.last_img read more

Anglican Church of Canada seeks ‘reconciliation animator’

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Communion Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Anglican Journal] The Anglican Church of Canada is looking for a “reconciliation animator” to help continue its work on reconciliation and justice with Indigenous peoples, and to support the work of the Primate’s Commission on Discovery, Reconciliation and Justice.At the Nov. 17 meeting of Council of General Synod, the commission’s co-chairs, the Rev. Andrew Wesley and Archbishop (ret.) Terence Finlay, asked that the council make funds available to hire a full-time staff person to support the commission’s work.Full article. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Anglican Church of Canada seeks ‘reconciliation animator’ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service By André Forget Posted Nov 21, 2016 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Releaselast_img read more

Olympia diocese welcomes refugees, sues to keep resettlement efforts alive

first_img Rector Belleville, IL By David PaulsenPosted Feb 10, 2017 Don Ellis says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Episcopal Migration Ministries, Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH February 14, 2017 at 4:19 pm I agree completely with Mr. Davis and Mr. Louis. Here in Boston our Diocese has deliberately politicized itself in an extremely left-wing manner which is already starting to split apart the distinguished Episcopal church of which I have been a member for many years. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Josefina Beecher says: Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI walter woodson says: Rector Smithfield, NC Fred Reynolds says: February 17, 2017 at 10:44 am I would guess that about 30% or so of lay Episcopalians support our new President. When official pronouncements of our Church begin to sound as ideological, politically, as they are beginning to sound, this starts to be received — emotionally — as a kind of “excommunication”. I fear that many sincere Episcopalians, feeling judged by their own Church, are going to quietly drop out. Some people may say ‘good riddance’, but that wouldn’t be right. February 12, 2017 at 8:04 pm Mr. Davis I agree wholeheartedly. Well said. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS February 10, 2017 at 10:07 pm Susan – that’s a typo; should be “church’s stance *on* religious tests for refugees.” And, no, TEC has no such test and opposes such “tests”. You can access a January 25, 2017 Episcopal News Service release for more details.Peace. Olympia diocese welcomes refugees, sues to keep resettlement efforts alive Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL February 10, 2017 at 8:09 pm I’m pleased the appellate court blocked reinstatement of the administration’s travel ban that disrupted so many lives. I’m also pleased the church has stepped in with funds to continue the work of welcoming the stranger. I am curious, though, what is meant by “church’s stance of religious tests for refugees.” We have a religious test for refugees? Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY michael barth says: February 11, 2017 at 1:55 pm The church is not very different any other organization with a political agenda; rest assured the ECUSA has a very clear political agenda. Bill Lewis is on target. Follow the money; that’s the bottom line behind the sanctimony. February 25, 2017 at 10:27 am Exactly. We forget that our LORD and his parents were refugees in the land of Egypt escaping Herod’s persecution. Not to mention our own ancestors came over HERE as immigrants also. Just saying. Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Refugee Ban, February 10, 2017 at 7:51 pm Perhaps it is not so much a political issue as it is a moral issue. Peace….. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA February 10, 2017 at 4:07 pm As a life-long Episcopalian, I am concerned with these overtly political moves by the church. Neither this, nor the church’s involvement in the Dakota pipeline issue, represent my political views. While I respect the rights of others to their views, I am very concerned that the Episcopal church is ignoring the views of its conservative members and acting as if they speak with one voice for all Episcopalians. February 11, 2017 at 2:33 pm Proud and relieved to see our Diocesan Council and Bishop standing up to protect the dignity of every human being. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET February 21, 2017 at 10:02 am Happy to see this good work happening and I am sorry that it is seen as partizan. This love for our neighbors, the welcoming of strangers is what makes me proud to be an Episcopal. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Paul F. M. Zahl says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Donald Trump, February 25, 2017 at 10:27 am Indeed. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (16) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release February 10, 2017 at 11:38 pm Really read the gospels, and then see what kind of statement you can formulate about the conservatism of which Jesus would approve, remembering what he said to the conservatives that time. M. H. Fournier says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 10, 2017 at 7:47 pm Your pledges fund the Diocese and the greater church. If you and others are unhappy as am then pull your pledge to send them a message. Are you aware the Episcopal Executive Council just agreed to fund thecEpiscopal Migration Ministries with $500,000 to settle more refugees? They are funding this with money from our pledges. I wonder how many Episcopalians are aware of what the Greater Church does with their money. February 18, 2017 at 1:51 pm I was thirsty and you gave me drink;,,,,, I was in prison and you visited me…I guess those are political statements. Shame on you, Jesus, for being liberal in your teachings. Rector Washington, DC Richard T. McClellan says: Br. Tupper Morehead, TSSF says: Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK February 10, 2017 at 5:40 pm I would like to suggest that we take the labels “liberal” and “conservative.” off of all the children of God. I am in the Diocese of East Tennessee, and I recommend these words of The Right Reverend Charles vonRosenberg,”The radical message of Christianity–when it is preached and lived faithfully–is that Jesus Christ sees the world through the eyes of the powerless.” Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Patricia L. Farnell says: Faith & Politics, Syrian refugee Baraa Haj Khalaf, left, kisses her father Khaled as her mother Fattoum, right, cries after arriving at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois, on Feb. 7. Photo: Kamil Krzaczynski /REUTERS[Episcopal News Service] The federal appeals court ruling Feb. 9 that blocked reinstatement of the Trump administration’s temporary ban on refugee admissions was welcomed by Episcopal Church leaders in Washington, where the Diocese of Olympia is pursuing a separate lawsuit against the president’s executive order.The diocese helps coordinate the resettlement of 190 refugees each year. Of the refugees now preparing to arrive in the Seattle area, about 90 percent are expected to come from one of the seven Muslim-majority countries singled out in President Donald Trump’s Jan. 27 order, which also banned visitors and visa holders from those nations. A federal judge in Seattle temporarily blocked his ban on Feb. 6. It was that ruling that the three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, in San Francisco, upheld on Feb. 9The Diocese of Olympia and the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington filed a separate lawsuit Feb. 7 challenging the executive order.Refugees who had been held up at airports overseas when Trump first signed the executive order are now making their way to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Still, the legal uncertainty threatens to shutter the diocese’s Refugee Resettlement Office, a scenario Bishop Greg Rickel said would run counter to the Episcopal Church’s mission.“This executive order is a violation of the foundational principles of our nation,” Rickel said in a Feb. 7 statement announcing the lawsuit. “As a member of the Jesus Movement, I believe the United States has a moral responsibility to receive and help resettle refugees from the more than 65 million people who have been displaced by war, violence, famine, and persecution. To turn these vulnerable people away and limit the flow of refugees into our country is to dishonor the One we serve.”ACLU Washington agreed to take the case pro bono and filed the lawsuit on behalf of the Diocese of Olympia. Two unnamed University of Washington college students also are listed as plaintiffs in the class-action lawsuit.“A lot of the other lawsuits that have been filed against the (executive) order don’t specifically address the needs of refugees,” said Josh Hornbeck, the diocese communications director. But refugee resettlement is at the core of the Diocese of Olympia’s lawsuit.Its Refugee Resettlement Office is one of 31 affiliates nationwide that partner with Episcopal Migration Ministries to find homes in 27 Episcopal dioceses and 23 states for refugees escaping war, violence and persecution in their homelands. This year, 110,000 refugees were expected to arrive in the United States. Episcopal Migration Ministries is one of nine agencies – more than half of them faith-based – that work in partnership with the U.S. Department of State to welcome and resettle refugees.Those efforts were thrown into chaos late last month when Trump, seeking to fulfill a campaign promise to pursue “extreme vetting” of refugees, signed an executive order halting all refugee resettlement for 120 days while his administration reviews a security process that already can take years. The order also blocked entry for 90 days of visitors and visa holders from Iraq, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen, and from Syria indefinitely.As reaction to the order played out in the United States through protests, court cases and the White House’s evolving interpretations of its own order, refugees and visa holders initially were stuck in limbo.The Diocese of Olympia was about to welcome 12 individuals in five refugee families when the Jan. 27 ban first went into effect, but those families were left waiting at an airport in Kuwait, unable to board planes to the United States, Hornbeck said. Another 86 individuals had been vetted and were awaiting medical screenings before buying their plane tickets to Seattle, but they were suddenly prevented by the executive order from moving forward with those plans.Now that opponents of the Trump order have won an injunction while the legal battle proceeds, the Diocese of Olympia’s immediate efforts at resettlement are back on track. Hornbeck said four of the 12 refugees who had been waiting to board planes in Kuwait are expected to arrive in Seattle on Feb. 10.The Refugee Resettlement Office, like other EMM affiliates, works with host congregations to set up apartments for the incoming refugees and then to greet them at the airport and take them to their new homes. In the Seattle area, those homes typically are outside the city, in communities where housing prices are less expensive, Hornbeck said. The refugees also are given help in finding jobs and in adjusting to the new culture.The Seattle agency receives federal money to assist with the resettlement; even a temporary ban could cause enough financial harm as to cast doubt on the Refugee Resettlement Office’s ability to continue operations, Hornbeck said. Refugee resettlement money flows via EMM to the affiliate network under the terms of a contract with the federal government.The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council on Feb. 8 pledged solidarity with refugees while pursuing financial and legal responses to the president’s order.Council granted $500,000 to Episcopal Migration Ministries to bridge it financially during Trump’s suspension of refugee resettlement and as that work presumably resumes on a smaller scale. It also requested that the presiding bishop investigate whether it is “appropriate and advisable” to defend in court EMM’s refugee resettlement ministry and the church’s stance of religious tests for refugees.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Submit a Job Listing Susan Paynter says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tony Oberdorfer says: Ralph Davis says: Richard Atkinson says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bill Louis says: Rector Martinsville, VA Refugees Migration & Resettlement Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Richard T. McClellan says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

Oregon Bishop Michael Hanley posts statement on Las Vegas mass…

first_img [Episcopal Diocese of Oregon]From Bishop Michael Hanley:So sad to once again wake up to the news of violence in America. Praying today for the victims of the shooting in Las Vegas. Praying for the families of those killed and for all whose lives are irrevocably changed by the actions of this individual. My heart goes out to all affected. The Lord help us.Please see the comments for liturgical and action resources as well as an invitation to join in a public sign of mourning from Episcopalians Against Gun Violence.(Via Facebook.) Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Oregon Bishop Michael Hanley posts statement on Las Vegas mass shooting Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Las Vegas shooting Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Gun Violence, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Oct 3, 2017 Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

General Convention will again grapple with same-sex marriage questions

first_imgGeneral Convention will again grapple with same-sex marriage questions Issues involve equal access to the rites, more changes in marriage’s definition, status within the prayer book Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Same-Sex Marriage April 7, 2018 at 2:01 pm Why, why, why are we still allowing ourselves to be clapped in leg irons by people who have nothing better to do than obsess over the sexuality and/or gender of strangers?! We should be Long past better versions of living out such aspects of our faith as “to seek and serve Christ in all persons,” as we vow in our baptismal creed. Those who claim to cling to the Bible and quote the prayer book, yet ignore the many calls for justice because they’re too busy fantasizing about other people’s sex lives really might consider that their energy could be better devoted elsewhere.There is so much diversity even in gender and number just among the Names of God in God’s history in our own scriptures, that I really cannot respect any of the arguments citing some strait-laced take on a specific English Bible verse as being grounds to demean and discriminate against our fellows, whether that debasement is couched in pseudo-polite language or straight out hostile. Human Sexuality, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Letizia Modena says: April 7, 2018 at 12:58 am This is a good discussion, though I do think that including the All Sacraments for All People video in the middle of the article goes over the line from journalism reporting on an issue, to pretty clear advocacy. It’s Ok, but it’s not journalism. April 4, 2018 at 10:33 pm I’m not shaming anyone. I understand the Bible has a long history of exegesis, I understand deeply held beliefs and organic changes. I’m asking that a minority of dioceses stop shaming my wife and I (21 years) for how God made us. I’m asking that these dioceses stop shaming God for the creativity of his own… creation. I’m sorry that you feel shamed. I know what’s like and do not intend to ever inflict it on anyone, ever, in any way. I live by this. Every single day, in every context, with anyone who differs from me. Because I know what it means, and I wish I still had the priviledge of confusing “shaming” with “asking to reflect on a profound difference in opinion.” The second is irritating, ennerving, it can go as far as making one furious, if one chooses to. The first hurts human dignity. Peace. April 6, 2018 at 8:54 pm It is hard to avoid being perceived as condescending when one is nearly 60 years old, scheduled to marry her partner next Fall, and bone weary of explaining something that has been explained ad nauseam, ad infinitum, subjected to grueling exegesis, studied to death, and still those in favor of “the way it’s always been done” remain intransigently mired in the same tired objections. I am with retired Bishop Spong in that I will not engage in this debate any longer. http://www.unity.org/resources/articles/manifesto-time-has-come. He articulates it better than I. I am sorry if this wounds your conscience. The wedding is going forward on November 10, 2018. Pax, Gretchen April 10, 2018 at 7:24 am Bruce, I don’t know what Church you’ve been attending but in all my years as a Protestant attending different denominations I have never heard of my Church condoning slavery or any of the other things you accuse Episcopalians of supporting. To suggest its the Bible is outdated and bathed in superstition is to question the story of Christ and validity of Christianity itself. If you are so unhappy with the Church the way it is and the people in it then why do you stay? If the Church tries to force a different way of worship down my throat then I would take my financial support and worship elsewhere. Terry Francis says: April 5, 2018 at 5:26 pm I don’t believe Bishop David Reed of West Texas authorizes the trial rites, although his predecessor, Bishop Gary Lillibridge did. Last I checked, Bishop Reed is a Communion Partner bishop. I’m not from the Diocese of West Texas, so I have no way to check references on the use of the rites there. Could anyone shine some light of this matter? Comments navigation Newer comments April 6, 2018 at 10:53 pm Good people of deep faith can and do read the same Scriptures and come to a variety of conclusions on a whole host of issues — and what God’s best intentions are for God’s beloved LGBTQ people is definitely on that list. In the Episcopal Church we have been on a 40+ year journey from the 1976 declaration that “homosexual persons are children of God who have a full and equal claim with all other persons upon the love, acceptance, and pastoral concern and care of the Church.” Since that time the church has moved forward — again and again — to turn that resolution into a reality. Just as with the ordination of women in the 1970’s not everyone has agreed … but part of our charism as Anglicans has been to claim our big tent heritage by making room for minority theological opinions. As Anglicans we were formed in the crucible of the 16th century Reformation into a particular body ecclesial uniquely capable of being both protestant and catholic in a time when such a possibility was beyond imagining. We are, therefore, uniquely wired by our DNA to be a church that can hold together the tension of being both gay and straight in the 21st century. In the end the Gamaliel principle will determine the efficacy of the choices we have made as we respond to where we hear the Holy Spirit calling us into her future — and it will be God’s job to judge how we have responded to that call. In Austin the Episcopal Church has the opportunity to lift up “fidelity, monogamy, mutual affection and respect, careful, honest communication, and the holy love which enables those in such relationships to see in each other the image of God” as the values that make a marriage holy. It has the chance to talk about marriage as vocation of holy love, grounded in biblical values of faithfulness and forgiveness. And it has the opportunity to say we are a community of faith focused on supporting all who are called into the vocation of marriage – not discriminating against some who are called into the vocation of marriage. It’s a privilege to be part of that work. Joe Barker says: April 5, 2018 at 8:32 pm “All sacraments for all people” is catchy but a non-starter. To begin with the 2 great Sacraments are available to all. So, we’re taught that Marriage is a sacramental rite. Those rites are not for all. We don’t ordain babies. We don’t offer confession/reconciliation to toddlers. Some sacramental rites are for stages or events of a person’s life. No matter how hard it has been tried and no matter how many excuses are made by tantrums, demonstrations, and bullhorn bullying there is no justification for Christian Marriage for same gender couples found in the New Testament or in the traditions and Councils of the Church whose Catholic nature we claim to value every Sunday on the Creed. It is a novelty made up by activists by proof-texting their viewpoint. Nothing more. The only real fall-back argument often used is good old American egalitarianism where people just say that if they don’t get what they want that “its just not fair”. Submit a Press Release April 7, 2018 at 4:55 pm I would like to pose this solution to this seemingly intractable problem. Those people who oppose same-sex marriage should never ever enter into such a marriage, or even attend such a marriage even if those marrying include a son or a daughter. Just stay away. But I ask them to have the grace to permit those who are same-sex oriented to be able to have a religious ceremony (which, as we all know, is not necessary in order for a marriage to be legal; a civil ceremony would suffice) in an Episcopal church which should be welcoming to ALL people. Let us remember, and hang our heads in shame as we do, that over the years Christians including Episcopalians have used the Bible to support slavery, to oppose the franchise for women and to oppose mixed race marriage (which only became legal throughout the US only 50 years ago). Permitting our churches to celebrate same-sex marriages and mixed race marriages does not mean that every member must or should endorse such marriages. It merely means that two people’s choice of mate is no one’s business but their own and that they have the right to have a religious celebration of their marriage in a church which claims to be a welcoming church. Bertram Thompson says: Doug Desper says: Bruce Bogin says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Amy Pringle says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel April 6, 2018 at 1:13 pm Bruce, there are good people on both sides of this issue. Ridiculing and being condescending to those who disagree with you does not help your cause. All it does is cause anger and resentment from the people you’re criticizing. I’m assuming that’s not what you want. And here’s a news flash Bruce: It isn’t only straight white men who have a problem with same-sex marriage. Amazing how progressives like to categorize people on a given issue. Accusing people of paying “lip service” to being a Christian because they believe same-sex marriage goes against Biblical teachings is a very self-righteous, judgmental and unchristian attitude on your part. And using the number of wives Abraham had to prove your point is a total red herring. Has nothing to do with the issue. And I hate to inform you of this Bruce, but Scripture absolutely DOES uphold marriage between a man and a woman. Starting with Eve joining Adam in Genesis. It’s not a so-called model Bruce and it’s not ludicrous, it’s THE model the Bible uses. I know this may be hard for you and others in the LGBTQ community (btw, how many more letters are you going to add to this?) to believe, but our Lord loves those who disagree with you just as much as he loves you. Perhaps if you didn’t look down on good sincere Episcopalians and Christians in general who don’t believe in same-sex marriage, perhaps if you didn’t look upon them with contempt, then maybe more people would take you and your opinions seriously. Doug Desper says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Terry Francis says: April 6, 2018 at 6:41 pm Bruce has forgotten the Lord’s own view on marriage; a subject for which He quoted from Genesis 2 to provide incontrovertible clarity. On reading that it becomes clear that Bruce and others are wrong that Scripture doesn’t uphold 1 man/1woman as the model. The Lord said in Matthew 17, “haven’t you read where in the beginning God created them make and female…” and He finishes by quoting what is found in Genesis 2 as the basis for bonding. The errors of humanity have clouded that as Bruce observed about the patriarchs. Notwithstanding, Jesus returned the model to Genesis 2 where it has always been until humanity created the errors. This error of the patriarchs has been compounded by our so-called Marriage Study which totally left out Jesus’ teaching on marriage from Matthew/Genesis 2. It is truly sad that voices in our Church want to drown out the voice of Christ who brought clarity beyond dispute to this issue. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT April 10, 2018 at 5:43 am I will gladly accept everything you say about me. I will not shrink from condemning the views of those who would marginalize and discriminate against people whether by reason of race, gender or sexual orientation, particularly when those who so marginalize and so discriminate do so relying on Holy Scripture. There can be no valid argument in support of slavery. There can be no valid argument which reduces women to be the servants or chattels of men. There can be no valid argument which opposes the right of a white person to intermarry with a black person and there can be no valid argument which opposes the right of two persons of the same sex to intermarry and to have that marriage solemnized in a church. I am not bound and I will not be bound to recognize any such argument. I am proud of the Episcopal Church. I am proud that it consecrated a gay bishop in New Hampshire in 2003; that it thereafter consecrated a lesbian suffragan bishop; that it has ordained gay and lesbian priests who are living with their same-sex partners. I am not at all interested in ‘looking good’. I am interested only in the dignity of ALL people, no matter their race, gender or sexual orientation, and that the Episcopal Church treats them all alike. I don’t need your snide comment about my Christianity. That is solely a matter between me and my God. To me, it is right and just that homosexual people should have the same rights and rites as are given to heterosexual people. Its is not ‘right’ because I say so. It is right because all people are the same in Jesus Christ. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bill Louis says: General Convention, Bruce Bogin says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Robert Walker says: April 5, 2018 at 9:40 am The Sacrament of Holy Matrimony is reserved for marriage between a man and a woman. I respect the gays of the church, however I cannot condone marriage between two men or two woman. This is the reason we left the church after over 45 years and this is one of the reasons that the Episcopal church is continuing to die. Rector Washington, DC Same-Sex Blessings, The Rev. Thomas Jackson says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID April 4, 2018 at 8:25 pm I knew It! All that “all may, none must” lingo in 2015 has led to the pressure activists to show their teeth and intolerance and now demand that the whole Church obey their novel marriage theology. Their soft sell in 2015 was a tactic to move everyone to their ultimate goal of shaming the very people that differ from them and hold to traditional marriage as seen in Genesis 2/Matthew 17. Well played Integrity. Terry Francis says: Elizabeth R. Apgar Triano says: April 8, 2018 at 6:04 am Ms Russell, you claim that Anglicans (Episcopalians) have a tent big enough for minority theological opinions? If by minority you mean conservative/traditionalist opinions then you are totally wrong. That big tent closed its flaps to those opinions a long time ago. At best they’re simply ignored and at worse they are attacked and ridiculed. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Terry Francis says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments navigation Newer comments Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI “It was wonderful occasion of a diocese coming together in the face of the prospect of challenges to our unity,” Bauerschmidt told ENS.Davies Penley and Pereira said their and ASAP’s goal is “to draw the circle bigger,” in Davies Penley’s words. “This has been drawn here as this black-and-white, either-or issue,” she said. “I’m not going to change Bishop Bauerschmidt’s mind, and that’s not my job. I just want room for all of us.”“And while I disagree with priests in this diocese who say it’s wrong, I’m not trying to change their minds and I trust their hearts. They’re trying to do their best but leave space for us, too.”Geiszler-Ludlum and Russell said the resolution was a compromise that “was still a win for them.” Russell added that the history of the effort to allow all Episcopalians access to the sacrament of marriage has included other compromises along the way.A push for equal access in Central FloridaThe Rev. Alison Harrity, rector of St. Richard’s Episcopal Church in Winter Park, said some priests in the Diocese of Central Florida have considered what one called “a public act of canonical disobedience” after which they would face the consequences in order to draw attention to the disparity.Harrity and others from St. Richard’s and elsewhere in the diocese attempted in late January to have their diocesan convention change a canon that restricts marriage to heterosexual couples and denies clergy the ability to solemnize same-sex marriages. They also asked the diocese to commit to “ending institutional and other forms of discrimination for LGBTQ+ people” and form a task force to study the full inclusion of LGBTQ+ people in the sacramental life of the church.Both resolutions were ruled out of order weeks before the Jan. 26-27 convention because, Brewer said in his convention address, they failed to measure up in what he called his grid for decision-making. The grid is based on the text of the examination (page 517 of the Book of Common Prayer) of a bishop-elect during his or her ordination and consecration. Brewer said it helps him balance coherence with the faith of the apostles with the impact of any action on the faith, unity and discipline of the church, and what he called “my global responsibility as a leader who shares that leadership with other bishops throughout the world.”He called, instead, for a task force to reflect on the 2015 actions of General Convention on marriage, and their canonical and pastoral implications for diocesan congregations. The task force will also consider the biblical, theological and pastoral implications of convention’s actions.Brewer’s remarks on the resolutions begin at the 27:03 mark in this video.Geiszler-Ludlum called the proposed task force “a big step” because it means that there will be “some discussion within that diocese.”However, Jim Christoph, St. Richard’s senior warden, told ENS that the goal of the proposed task force “is not to research how this diocese is treating gay people. It’s to react to the national church and their error.” Christoph also objected to what he called Brewer’s “denunciation” by name of the St. Richard’s vestry during his address.“I felt very belittled,” said Stephen O’Connell, who is the secretary of St. Richard’s vestry. “I felt like I was a child being reprimanded in front of a whole group of people and shamed for something we felt was important.”Brewer has not been available for comment.Harrity said she “naively believed” that advocates of marriage equality would not have to resort to performing an act of canonical disobedience because they had a process available to them at diocesan convention to attempt to change the restrictive canon.“But, the truth of the matter is, this church allows bishops to make up rules along the margins of canon law, both national canon law and local canon law, that circumvent any process,” she said. “The only way that we are going to get anything done in regard to canonical rights for gay people in the church is to be disobedient to our bishops? I am not interested in getting spit on or having anybody that we’re connected to getting spit on when we have a process that would work for us if it was allowed to work.”Touching on larger issues of authorityThe question of access to marriage is part of a larger one about where a diocesan bishop’s authority ends.“There is the question of whether or not the bishop actually has the authority, canonically, to prohibit clergy under their licensure from functioning outside the diocese with liturgies approved by the General Convention,” Russell said. “There are those who argue it is not within their authority to do that. That is, for many in the church, not a settled point.”“There’s a wide divergence of opinion about how much control bishops have, and the bishops themselves have different views of that, too,” Geiszler-Ludlum said.There are other questions about authority. Can a bishop deny a sacrament to a group of people based on their sexual orientation? And can dioceses enact canons that restrict access to sacraments in ways that conflict with the canons of the wider church? Albany, Central Florida and Dallas have canons that restrict marriage to heterosexual couples. Rector Albany, NY Terry Francis says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET April 9, 2018 at 8:46 pm OK, we’ve heard how Via Media supposedly applies to the marriage question. Such a view believes that there are 2 ambiguous positions requiring a human discernment. Sorry to disappoint but there is no ambiguity here in Matthew 19 ** wherein Jesus returns the listeners to original design in Genesis 2. Humanity had tried every variation of bonding (the 21st century has nothing new), but the Head of the Jesus Movement bypassed mind-numbing Indaba and reversed right back to Genesis:3 Some Pharisees came to him, and to test him they asked, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife for any cause?” 4 He answered, “HAVE YOU NOT READ that the one who made them at the beginning ‘made them male and female,’ 5 and said, ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh’? 6 So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.” 7 They said to him, “Why then did Moses command us to give a certificate of dismissal and to divorce her?” 8 He said to them, “It was because YOU WERE SO HARD-HEARTED that Moses allowed you to divorce your wives, but FROM THE BEGINNING IT WAS NOT SO”.Everything that could be a marriage was being tried in the time of Jesus, but the Lord called His movement to reclaim Genesis. (Maybe that’s why this passage was left out of the Marriage Study).So, in comparison to these very plain words reinforcing the original design of marriage what are we to make of comments like these:“Use of Scripture to support denying marriage to same sex couples is ludicrous”.“Some people think marriage is only for a man and a woman. I disagree. As Episcopalians, we are called to embrace a diversity of opinions”.“…people of deep faith can and do read the same Scriptures and come to a variety of conclusions.”“…I really cannot respect any of the arguments citing some strait-laced take on a specific English Bible verse.”“I have never been able to understand why some people want to take writings that were written two thousand years ago and more to circumscribe their lives”.General Convention delegates, I would quake for the Head of the Jesus Movement to look upon Austin and announce “HAVE YOU NOT READ?”, “YOU WERE SO HARD-HEARTED”, and “FROM THE BEGINNING IT WAS NOT SO.”(** I erroneously typed Matthew 17 earlier, but it doesn’t change the Gospel passage). Resolution B012, April 7, 2018 at 11:05 am My fantasy:1) Yes, revise the whole BCP. Make it digital as well as a print option, to keep replacement costs down.2) Revise and expand the marriage rite to eliminate all that church-as-bride-of-Christ stuff and add more optional and participatory prayers and blessings, per the NZ book.3) Change the rubrics to be gender-flexible.4) Done. April 8, 2018 at 4:57 am Gretchen, our objections are no more “tiresome” than you and others in the gay community constantly trying to convince others (and yourselves) that same sex marriage is totally compatible with Biblical teachings. It’s not. And all the LGBT propaganda isn’t going to make it so. Can’t really blame you for deciding to no longer debate this issue. It’s awfully hard to defend a lie. Oh and bty, my conscience isn’t wounded in any way. You and your partner have a nice life together. General Convention 2018, April 6, 2018 at 11:26 am After decades of engagement over the issues of the full inclusion of LGBTQ people in the life of the Episcopal Church, it still baffles me how threatened and fearful straight white men are of us. Use of Scripture to support denying marriage to same sex couples is ludicrous. Scripture does NOT uphold our so-called model of marriage as being “one man and one woman.” How many wives did Abraham have? How many did Jacob/Israel have? The model was one man and as many wives (and concubines) as he could support. Even in the Christian testament, only bishops and deacons are forbidden from having more than one wife. Polygamy is not forbidden for anyone else. Paul’s view was that no one should marry and had his view won out, the new church would have died out in one or two generations. So what is the real issue here? We pray regularly that we will respect the dignity of every human being and that we will seek and serve Christ in all persons, loving our neighbor as ourselves. Do we mean those promises? Are they just lip service? Or have we tacked on our own little exceptions to them to support our individual prejudices? Is denying a loving, monogamous and committed couple the ability to marry in the church they love respecting their dignity? Is such a position seeking and serving Christ in them? Remember, Jesus’ remarks about marriage were essentially in the context of a discussion about divorce! People want to blame the loss of membership on the Episcopal Church’s support of LGBTQ persons. The more accurate reasons are: our low birth rates resulting in more funerals than baptisms; our failure to engage with the communities around us and making “The Episcopal Church Welcomes You” a reality without exceptions; the meanness and hypocrisy perceived by young people about how the church treats minorities. Why would anyone want to come to a church where they will be denigrated and treated less than a full child of God?I grew up in the fifties when the “ideal” was dad at work, mom at home cooking and cleaning and all the world so wonderfully perfect. That was all hogwash and we knew it. We stereotyped people into roles without regard to their gifts and abilities. We had an abysmal track record with race relations. The fifties were never the picture perfect world of Ozzie and Harriet! It’s time we stopped clinging to those lies and dealt with reality. Marriages fail. The work force has changed. There is some degree of equality among us now, but that is constantly under threat.If you don’t want to marry someone of your same sex, fine. Such is your right and privilege. But stop imposing your inability to conceive that God might be doing something different on everyone else. The Holy Spirit works in strange and mysterious ways….or have we forgotten that possibility?Bruce GarnerL4, Atlanta Bauerschmidt hopes that the Episcopal Church will “find a way to make room for those who hold the traditional teaching of the church on marriage,” and to acknowledge that those people are “loyal members of the Episcopal Church.” He hopes for a “robust” solution that lasts over time and doesn’t need to be renewed every three years.“I think it’s going to require the creativity of a lot of people,” he said.Bauerschmidt added that he hopes convention will also “preserve the traditional and canonical responsibilities of bishops,” adding, “I really don’t know what that looks like, but I think that’s important, too.”The task force’s suggested solution to the access question is part of a proposed resolution outlining how convention might make “permanent additions and revisions to the Book of Common Prayer” of four marriage liturgies and specific gender-neutralizing word changes about marriage.Those proposals could run in tandem with convention’s consideration of whether and how to begin a process for revising the prayer book. Convention’s legislative committee that will review all prayer book revision resolutions will handle the task force’s proposals. The task force is not proposing that the prayer book would need to be reprinted but that the additional rites be published separately at first.The task force also is proposing to change Book of Common Prayer’s “An Outline of the Faith,” also known as the Catechism, to state that Christian marriage involves “two people,” not “the woman and the man,” as it now says on page 861. It would also add a question about marriage to explain the canonical requirements for marriage, including instruction in the purposes of Christian marriage.The task force’s report was summarized during a side gathering at the March 6-9 House of Bishops retreat. Bauerschmidt said any proposal to change the Catechism’s definition of marriage “would be of great concern to those who hold to the traditional teaching” about marriage both inside and outside the Episcopal Church.Although the March HOB meeting is traditionally largely private, Springfield Bishop Dan Martins blogged about each day’s sessions. On March 8, he wrote that he attended the gathering and rejected the proposal to consider the trial use liturgies to be part of the prayer book.Martins noted that while a diocesan bishop can refuse to permit use of a trial liturgy, he or she cannot prevent clergy from using material deemed to be part of the Book of Common Prayer. He said the proposal “deserved a lot more consideration than it is getting at this meeting of the house.”He added that it was “borderline dereliction of duty” not to have the entire house discuss the proposal. If the convention’s decision in 2003 to allow the Diocese of New Hampshire to have Gene Robinson, an openly gay partnered man, as its bishop was “an earthquake,” Martins wrote, “approval of anything like the Task Force on Marriage’s proposal would be a catastrophic aftershock.”Gieszler-Ludlum and Russell said the task force members reached their conclusions by consensus. However, the Rev. Jordan Hylden, canon theologian of the Diocese of Dallas, filed a minority report, which begins on page 116 of the report, objecting to the makeup of the task force and its process, conclusions and their implications.The task force has written a FAQ document outlining its work. It is available here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is interim managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Doug Desper says: April 9, 2018 at 2:24 pm Bruce, what I find appalling is your attitude toward people who disagree with you on this issue. Judging from your rhetoric you apparently feel that people who believe that same sex marriage goes against Biblical teachings are morally, intellectually, and spiritually beneath you. When you say you are “appalled” by people who are still enslaved to ancient concepts of superstition and patriarchy you sound more like an outspoken atheist than a Christian. (You DO claim to be a Christian, right?) Stop ridiculing people who disagree with you on this issue. It doesn’t make you look good. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Susan Russell says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books April 6, 2018 at 7:56 pm Speaking of “fear”, what I truly shudder about is not gay folks. What I shudder about is the ease with which His teaching was left out of the Marriage Study in deference to many verbose pages of human philosophy as the guide. I shudder that bishops are saying that ignoring Christ in Matthew 17/Genesis 2 does not rise to the same as denying an article of faith even though such undermines His lordship that we affirm. I shudder and fear that our Vestry oaths and ordination oaths become pointless in that we really must not mean that we believe that “Scripture contains all things necessary…” while elevating human experience as the authority over Christ to understand marriage. I shudder that the Jesus Movement doesn’t want to hear from Jesus on this important matter. You won’t find His clear teaching in our Marriage Study or Task Force documents. I fear that “respecting the dignity of all” has devolved to mean “give me what I demand”. Having disconnected from Matthew/Genesis 2 this Church will have no choice in the future than to bless what humanity calls a marriage… 3 people? What would be the reason to exclude them in 150 years given the proposed standard of human experience and demand as the norm over Scripture? Those are the things that we should fear. April 5, 2018 at 2:17 pm At age 76, change in the Diocese of Dallas will be far too late for me, but I must always have hope for the future so that members of a parish Church which is their “home” will be able to be married or have their civil marriage blessed in their own Church in the presence of their “family”. Our present Bishop is a lost cause. He will never change his opinion since that opinion was a prerequisite for being elected Bishop of this diocese. I transferred my letter to a parish that is known by many in the national Church as a haven for gay Episcopalians in Dallas, St. Thomas the Apostle. The 30 years I have been a member of this parish has been a wonderful gift from God and has given me the opportunity to give what talent I have in many areas of work for the parish. Only action by the General Convention will let members of this diocese become equal members of the Episcopal Church. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bruce Garner says: Submit a Job Listing Comments (32) Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Doug Desper says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Len Freeman says: April 6, 2018 at 2:59 pm The bishops of Tennessee and Central Florida suggest that accepting same-sex marriage blessings poses a threat to the unity of their dioceses, but at least the issue has been discussed in their conventions. Stark differences were openly acknowledged, and no agreement was reached, but the Tennessee convention established some unity in adopting a “memorial” to the General Convention, and the Diocese of Central Florida was able to establish a task force to study the marriage issue.In contrast to the discord apparent in Tennessee and Central Florida conventions, the Diocese of Florida, another of the eight dioceses that do not permit use of the trial rites for blessing same-sex relationships, appears to have maintained relative peace and unity, with the avoidance of diocesan discussions or public statements on controversial issues, including those affecting LGBT and racial minorities. In fact, curious worshippers in the Diocese of Florida have not been able to point to any scriptural argument from their Diocese for withholding use of the trial rites, with the only known justification of the Diocesan policy being that the rites are not incorporated in the Prayer Book. It remains to be seen whether the Diocese of Florida’s policy of unity in silence or the more confrontational policy is the more loving and effective way to ultimately reconcile our differences. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Doug Desper says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bruce Bogin says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ April 6, 2018 at 10:30 pm Why is it “All that “all may, none must” always means “All may (except when I disagree with them, in which case they can’t)?” Seems to me the way to a church that truly lives well with diversity (if this diversity is to be more than skin deep and include diversity of opinion) is to allow congregations that believe in marriage equality to marry people regardless of sexual orientation. Instead we have some who wish to continue a form of spiritual apartheid against same sex couples who wish to be married. You forcing me to live by your rules/theology in ‘your’ church is what’s at stake. No one is demanding that every parish in the church perform same sex marriages. No one is asking that clergy who decline to marry same sex couples be disciplined. All we seek is a church where those who believe “all are welcome” includes LGBT people are able to offer all of the sacraments to all of God’s people. It is that simple.And why do you think that allowing congregations to marry same sex couples means you personally approve of those marriages? I mean, do you get to approve every marriage in the church that is between a man and a woman? Do I? Of course not! But when it comes to this issue, some folks seem to think allowing same sex marriages in ‘their’ diocese means ‘they personally approve’ of same sex marriage. Why not just say you disagree and leave it at that?The answer seems to still be because some people can’t uncouple their personal theology from an unreasonable desire to force others to live by personal theology. Barring all churches in a diocese from marrying same sex coup les is just one example of forcing others to live by your personal theology. Allowing those churches who feel called to bless same sex marriage to do so doesn’t force those who oppose same sex marriage to do anything.As for folks whose actions seem to reflect “very self-righteous, judgmental and unchristian attitude[s],” a look at the recent history of our church suggests that those who have long excelled at deserving this criticism include those who opposed the Freedom Riders, opposing the war in Vietnam, opposing the ordination of women, opposed the baptism of LGBT people, opposed ordination of LGBTG people, oppose marriage equality, and oppose treating transgender people as real human beings who are worthy of our love, acceptance and support. IF you need to “proof text” this consider: “No matter how hard it has been tried and no matter how many excuses are made by tantrums, demonstrations, and bullhorn bullying there is no justification for Christian Marriage for same gender couples found in the New Testament or in the traditions and Councils of the Church whose Catholic nature we claim to value every Sunday on the Creed. It is a novelty made up by activists by proof-texting their viewpoint.” Interesting how so often people accuse others of the weaknesses they see in their own arguments. Frankly, this process has dragged on far too long. We have been back and forth over this ground time and again. Some people think marriage is only for a man and a woman. I disagree. As Episcopalians, we are called to embrace a diversity of opinions. But that is only possible when people agree to speak and act with respect. Demanding that marriage equality vary by zip code enables one group to force their theology on others who disagree with their theology. Allowing marriage equality throughout the church simply allows every parish the freedom to respond to same sex couples as they believe they are called by God to respond. I hope and pray that will not be too much to ask. “Liturgical Resources 1: I Will Bless You and You Will Be a Blessing” was one of the rites General Convention authorized in 2015 for trial use. Photo: Church Publishing Inc.[Episcopal News Service] On June 26, 2015, when a U.S. Supreme Court ruling legalized same-sex marriage nationwide, the 78th General Convention was in its second day.A few days later, convention authorized two new marriage rites for trial use (Resolution A054) by both same-sex and opposite-sex couples. The bishops and deputies also made the canonical definition (via Resolution A036) of marriage gender-neutral.Indie Pereira asked her priest, who was at convention in Salt Lake City, if this meant she and her then-fiancée could finally get married at their parish in Tennessee.It wasn’t until November 2015 that the answer to Pereira’s question became clear. Diocese of Tennessee Bishop John Bauerschmidt told the diocese that he would not allow the use of the rites and that only marriages between men and women could be performed in the diocese. He said that same-sex couples could work with Diocese of Kentucky clergy, whose bishops said they could use the rites.“From my perspective, I don’t really want to have a destination wedding in Kentucky, not to insult Kentucky,” Pereira told Episcopal News Service.Thus, “almost three years later, we still haven’t had access to a church wedding, which we had been hoping for,” said Pereira, who attends St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Nashville. She and her partner had a civil marriage but, she added, “I still hope that I can have my marriage blessed in my parish.” And blessed by the priest who, she said, “has walked with me through some of the most difficult moments of my life.”When convention authorized the liturgies in 2015, bishops and deputies said individual diocesan bishops had to approve their use. And convention directed diocesan bishops to “make provision for all couples asking to be married in this church to have access to these liturgies.”General Convention’s Task Force on the Study of Marriage has since monitored the use of the trial liturgies and is aware of concern about unequal access to the trial use liturgies. Its Blue Book Report, released April 3, says it found that eight diocesan bishops in the church’s 101 domestic dioceses have not authorized the trial liturgies.The Episcopal Church includes 10 dioceses in civil legal jurisdictions that do not allow marriage for same-sex couples. Since church canons require compliance with both civil and canonical requirements for marriage, convention did not authorize the trial liturgies for use in those dioceses. The task force received a statement that was signed by five Province IX diocesan bishops and one retired bishop representing the dioceses of Ecuador Litoral, Ecuador Central, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela and Honduras. Their statement criticized the task force’s recommendations and threatened that approval would “greatly deepen the breach, the division and the Ninth Province will have to learn to walk alone.” The bishops of Colombia and Puerto Rico did not sign the statement.The task force is proposing that convention require bishops in authority to “make provision for all couples asking to be married in this church to have reasonable and convenient access to these trial rites.” It also would have convention say that bishops will “continue the work of leading the church in comprehensive engagement with these materials and continue to provide generous pastoral response to meet the needs of members of this church.” The reference to “generous pastoral response” echoes Resolution 2009-C056, which forms part of the history of the church’s move toward marriage equality.In the General Convention worship hall before the daily Eucharist on June 26, 2015, the Rev. Susan Russell, a longtime advocate for the full inclusion of gays and lesbians in the church, past president of Integrity, and senior associate at All Saints Church in Pasadena, California, celebrates that day’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling legalizing same-sex marriage. With her is the Rev. Michael Sniffen, now the dean of the Cathedral of the Incarnation in Garden City, New York, and a self-described “straight ally.” Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceEssentially, the task force is saying that, in the words of the Rev. Susan Russell, a task force member who helped research the acceptance and use of the trial liturgies, “it shouldn’t depend on your ZIP code to have access to the rites.”The eight bishops who have prohibited same-gender marriage in their dioceses are Albany Bishop William Love, Central Florida Bishop Greg Brewer, Dallas Bishop George Sumner, Florida Bishop John Howard, North Dakota Bishop Michael Smith, Springfield Bishop Dan Martins, Tennessee’s Bauerschmidt and Virgin Islands Bishop Ambrose Gumbs, according to the task force.Love, Brewer, Sumner, Martins and Bauerschmidt prohibit clergy canonically resident in those dioceses to use the liturgies inside or outside of the diocese, the report said.“At this point it’s very unclear whether canonically resident clergy could actually use the liturgies [anywhere] without the permission of their own bishop,” Bauerschmidt told ENS before the report was released. “So, that’s not so much my idea, but I think it’s implied by the 2015 resolution.”The bishops in Albany, Central Florida, Dallas, Florida and Tennessee have told same-sex couples who wish to be married to go to a neighboring diocese, according to the report. Smith has provided Delegated Episcopal Pastoral Oversight (DEPO) for a parish that asked to use the liturgies. The task force said it could not determine whether Gumbs has made provisions for Virgin Islands couples to access the liturgies.“I was honestly quite surprised to find that the liturgies were being so overwhelmingly received and overwhelmingly authorized with so few restrictions,” Russell, a longtime advocate for the full inclusion of LBGTQI people in the life of the church, told Episcopal News Service.“I couldn’t have imagined those numbers 10 years ago,” she added.Task Force Chair Joan Geiszler-Ludlum agreed. She told ENS that the group found that the restrictions some bishops have placed on their use are “fairly innocuous” and include such things as approval of both the rector and the vestry or use after a congregational discernment process.The overwhelming majority of task force members agreed to call for the whole church to have equal access to the rites, Geiszler-Ludlum and Russell said.The proposed new requirement of “reasonable and convenient access” is not the only recommendation on marriage that the task force is making to General Convention. The group is calling for continued trial use of the liturgies as additions to the Book of Common Prayer, as well as amendments to the prayer book’s other marriage rites, prefaces and sections of the Catechism to make language gender-neutral.The task force would also have convention authorize two liturgies for blessing the relationships of couples who choose not to marry for legal or financial reasons. It also recommends that the church ponder new ways to minister to the growing number of people who cohabitate in committed and monogamous relationships rather than marry. ENS coverage of those recommendations can be found here.Meanwhile back in TennesseeEpiscopalians who live in the eight dioceses and want access to same-sex marriage worry that the rest of the church does not grasp their situation. Connally Davies Penley, who helped form the advocacy group All Sacraments for All People, or ASAP, in the Diocese of Tennessee, says that when she travels to other dioceses and tells her diocese’s story “people are just astonished. They have no idea that this is happening. I think if people know, we can get somewhere, but they just don’t know.”ASAP and five congregations submitted a diocesan convention resolution to have the diocese ask General Convention to allow clergy and churches to decide on access to the same-sex marriage rites, instead of bishops.“I think the work before us is to learn how to speak to each other in a gracious way, not to engage in legislation. The trouble with legislative fixes is that in making them we create winners and losers,” Bauerschmidt said in his address to diocese convention.In the end, the convention passed a substitute resolution to send a so-called “memorial” to General Convention asking that its 2018 deliberations “take into account the exclusions, competing convictions, and loss of community experienced by the members of this diocese under the current terms of authorization for these texts.”ASAP supported the substitute resolution “because we thought it could pass and it did almost unanimously, and so to have something from the whole diocese with an almost unanimous vote seemed powerful,” said Davies Penley.Pereira agreed. “It said that the way things are currently are not working well for our diocese, so we thought that was a good start,” she said. April 8, 2018 at 5:41 am I have never been able to understand why some people want to take writings that were written two thousand years ago and more to circumscribe their lives. How are they unable to accept the knowledge of our bodies and minds which has been revealed in that time. I find it appalling that even after those two thousand years now in the twenty-first century we are still enslaved to ancient concepts of superstition and patriarchy. In the recent past Christians, including Episcopalians, have supported slavery, have opposed franchise for women, have opposed inter-racial marriage, have opposed integrated schools based on their interpretation of the Bible, and for this we should hang our heads in shame. Now in the twenty-first century when most of us have finally learned that homosexuality is something someone is born with, there are those who insist on living in the first century. Well, I have a solution. Those people who oppose same sex marriage should not marry someone of the same sex and they should never attend a same sex wedding even if one of the persons in the wedding is their son or daughter, but they should have the grace to permit those who wish to marry a person of the same sex to have that marriage solemnized in a religious ceremony in a church which is welcoming to all. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 4, 2018 April 8, 2018 at 5:41 am So Ms Triano, if one thinks same sex marriage is against Biblical teachings then one is “fantasizing” about other people’s sex lives?? What a truly asinine statement. But then, spoken like a true progressive. Gretchen R Chateau says: Steve Williams says: Marriage Equality, Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

Congolese archdeacon murdered amid increased violence against Christians in Africa

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion UN peacekeepers work in North Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Photo: Kevin Jordan via ACNS[Anglican Communion News Service] A spate of violence against Christians has included the murder of the Archdeacon of Eringeti, Ngulongo Year Batsemire of the Anglican Church of the Congo, who was killed for refusing to denounce his faith. The Barnabas Fund reports that he was walking to his fields with his wife when they were surrounded by members of the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF) who demanded he convert to Islam. When he refused, they killed him.He was one of 36 Christians murdered by insurgents on Jan. 29 in the North Kivu region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Earlier this month, in three days of terror beginning on Feb. 7, another 30 Christians were killed in attacks in the villages of Toko-Toko and Makeke.Read the entire article here. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Africa, Tags Posted Feb 27, 2020 center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Congolese archdeacon murdered amid increased violence against Christians in Africa Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more

Gas station myth or fact: What you need to know when…

first_img Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSGas StationsMyths Previous articleWhat are 2015’s most popular baby names?Next article10 ways to be more active during the work day Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here On any given day, some 40 million Americans stop at gas stations to fill their tanks. For many, it’s a weekly routine, one they don’t spend much time analyzing, but are there things you think you know about your fill-up that just aren’t true?Andrea Kaufman considers herself a fairly conscientious auto owner, but the St. Louis Park, Minnesota resident admits she doesn’t know the finer details of pumping protocol. “I’ve heard plenty of gas station tips and tricks, but I’m not always sure which ones I should believe.”Let’s set the record straight as energy experts dispel three common gas station myths.Myth #1: It’s best to buy gas early in the day.The theory is that gasoline is denser at cooler temperatures, so you’ll get more fuel per gallon early in the morning. While the basic science is correct, the experts at Consumer Reports point out two practical reasons why this is a myth.First, most gas stations store fuel in double-walled underground tanks that keep gas at steady temperatures. Second, even if there were variations, the volume difference between gasoline at 75 versus 60 degrees Fahrenheit is just 1 percent – not enough to be noticeable at the pump.Myth #2: It’s dangerous to use a cell phone near gas pumps.According to the Federal Communications Commission, there is no documented incident of a wireless phone causing a gas station fire or explosion.It’s true that many fuel companies post stickers on pumps warning motorists to turn off phones while refueling as cell phones could be a distraction. But the Petroleum Equipment Institute (PEI) reports the most likely cause of fire at the pumps is static electricity created by drivers sliding in and out of vehicles. For safe refueling, PEI recommends you turn off the car engine, refrain from smoking and stay outside the vehicle.Myth #3: All brands of gas are the same.Like more than two-thirds of Americans, Kaufman buys gas primarily based on price and convenience. “I don’t know if there is a difference between brands,” she says. While all gasoline sold in the U.S. must meet federal requirements for performance, not all gas is the same.The auto industry has a certification system for fuel. Top Tier certified gasoline includes additional detergents and fuel additives that remove engine deposits that can hurt fuel economy.“Today’s more fuel-efficient engines need higher-quality fuel for peak performance,” says Akhtar Hussain, refined fuels expert at CHS, which markets Cenex brand fuels at more than 1,450 gas stations in 19 states. “Cenex TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline provides 2.5 times the cleaning power of conventional gasoline and removes deposits for better fuel economy and reduced emissions.”Our Top Tier certified gasoline keeps newer high-precision engines clean and helps older engines perform better, he adds. “It helps clean your engine every time you fill your tank.” Cenex TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline is available at every Cenex location. To find one near you, visit cenex.com/locations.So much for those tank-filling myths. Now it’s time to fuel up and enjoy the drive. Please enter your name here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Please enter your comment! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 last_img read more

Second Harvest facilitating donations to Hurricane Harvey victims

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter  Feeding America Network to Coordinate Disaster Relief Plan  Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida is accepting non-perishable food donations specifically for Texas flood relief efforts. As part of the Feeding America Network, Second Harvest and other food banks across the country stand ready to support the recovery phase of the flooding caused by the storm.Through its major disaster relief plan, Feeding America will channel millions of meals into the affected areas as soon as the rescue phase has passed. Food banks such as Second Harvest will distribute collected donations through Feeding America and may be asked to send staff who are experienced in disaster relief.“Our team is ready to send collected food to Texas while maintaining our own readiness in Central Florida during this hurricane season,” said Greg Higgerson, vice president of development for Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida.Although the needs of the victims are many, Second Harvest can accept only donations of non-perishable foods. Furniture, clothing and other household items cannot be donated through the food bank.“The easiest and most effective way to give back to the victims remains a financial donation directly to the Houston Food Bank or Feeding Texas,” said Dave Krepcho, president and CEO of Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida. “Sending any goods to the affected areas in an uncoordinated way is likely to contribute to the ‘disaster within a disaster’ that often results in these situations.”Hurricane Harvey has dumped approximately 11 trillion gallons of water on Houston and the surrounding areas. As many as 30,000 people will be evacuated from their homes.To donate to the Houston Food Bank, visit www.houstonfoodbank.org.To donate to Feeding Texas, visit www.feedingtexas.org.For more information on Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida, visit www.FeedHopeNow.org.Local non-perishable food donations for Texas flood relief may be dropped off at the following locations:Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida (main distribution center)411 Mercy DriveOrlando, Fla. 32805Contact: Carlos Santamaria, director of operationsPhone: 407-295-1066Email: [email protected] donations Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.Volusia Branch 320 North St.Daytona Beach, Fla. 32114Contact: Robert Thomas, Volusia operations managerPhone: 386-257-4499Email: [email protected] donations Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.Brevard Branch6928A Vickie CircleWest Melbourne, Fla. 32904Contact: Greg Hansen, Brevard operations managerPhone: 321-733-1600Email: [email protected] donations Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.About Second Harvest Food Bank of Central FloridaSHFBCF is a member of Feeding America – the largest charitable domestic hunger-relief organization in the United States. SHFBCF secures and distributes food and grocery products to approximately 550 local nonprofit feeding programs throughout Central Florida. Last year, with the help of food and financial donors, volunteers and a caring, committed community, the food bank distributed 54 million meals to partner programs such as food pantries, soup kitchens, women’s shelters, senior centers, day care centers and Kids Cafes. In addition, Second Harvest’s 14-week culinary program teaches foodservice-based technical, life and employability skills to economically hard-pressed adults. Second Harvest is distributing enough food to feed 48,000 people a day. To learn more about SHFBCF, visit www.FeedHopeNow.org. Reply August 30, 2017 at 5:50 pm Things he should be called on for, and things that he should be called out on, actually! Mama Mia One of my all time favorite people, that I used to watch with great amusement, and liked her was the late great Anna Nicole Smith, born Vickie Lynn Hogan……she was born there in Houston, Texas in 1967. What a life she lived! Add her to the list of people I admired, along with Princess Diana. According to a commentary in the Orlando Sentinel, a day or so ago, oh, I must be a desperate person in need of applause, because I admired Princess Diana, like so many other millions of people, and the commentary claimed that Diana was desperate person and seeking applause, and that we Princess Diana admirers seek the same as her……..see, I told you all along, I could of been one of the Desperate Housewives of Wisteria Lane…..LOL I wouldn’t want to be the President of the US. Damn if you do, damn if you don’t, no matter what a president does, he is under major scrutiny. What he wears, where he goes, when he goes, what he says, who he takes with him, and is criticized for what he says, and if he just sits there and says nothing, then he is criticized for not talking! Impossible to please everyone. Not that there are things he should be called on for, but just for going to Corpus Christie and viewing the hurricane damage, he got blasted for everything, you name it. I don’t feel sorry for him though….LOL August 30, 2017 at 11:12 pm Please enter your name here Reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. August 30, 2017 at 5:07 pm August 30, 2017 at 8:04 pm Reply Best Buy in the Texas hurricane area had a sign advertising a 24 case of Dasani bottled drinking water for $ 42.96. It usually goes for around $ 5.00 at the grocery stores there, give or take a little. When customers said that is price gouging, Best Buy said it was an honest mistake, and that some store employees had taken the price for an single bottle of the water, and had multiplied it by 24 bottles, and that is how the high price occurred. Hmmm? One gas station was turned in to the state’s price gouging hot line, and was selling cases of bottled drinking water for $ 99.00. Ironic that the problem in that part of Texas is all the water everywhere, and yet the flood victims are getting the shaft when buying needed drinking water. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Mama Mia TAGSFeeding America Food BankHurricane HarveySecond Harvest Food Bank Previous article3 tips to keep your child safe from mosquitoesNext articlePermits will be easier for contractors in Orange County Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Mama Mia August 30, 2017 at 5:46 pm Reply August 30, 2017 at 7:09 pm The Anatomy of Fear Mama Mia Reply Mama Mia I can’t imagine how it would be, to be in an area with flood water up to the level of where your roof starts on your home. I hope that never happens around here! Debary, Florida is a deceiving town. You drive through there and it looks high and dry, but oh when the rain of the hurricanes come, look out for the major flooding. August 31, 2017 at 12:11 am Mama Mia Reply August 31, 2017 at 1:30 am Reply 17 COMMENTS Mama Mia Mama Mia August 30, 2017 at 7:03 pm It looks like a potential hurricane is headed our way. Irma. That’s the name. Looks like it is heading in from the east, and upward toward us, if it doesn’t change course. Possibly could be here 10 days away, and at this point, it is just an Atlantic tropical storm, but it could worsen and be a potential threat to us here in Central Florida. Mama Mia If Anna Nicole Smith were still alive today, she would be turning the big 50 this November. Hard to believe. Mama Miacenter_img August 30, 2017 at 5:22 pm I heard something about Trump wants to reduce the tax rate on corporations from 35% down to 15%. How does he expect to build the border wall, re-build all the infrastructure that he has said he wants, pay for the massive hurricane relief, pay for the increased troops he is going to send to Afghanistan, and build up our military with new fighter jets, warships, arms, and nuclear arsenal that he wants, have funds for emergencies, funds for all the wars he wants, and funds for Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, and funds for the Veterans that he has promised, as well as so many other additional things that he wants like way more ICE agents, and Home Land Security equipment, people, and programs to fight terrorism. Does not make sense where he plans to get all the money needed. Maybe he is just looking out for his own corporations and their bottom line, and his own wallet, and not the people of this country….. I bet I know what will get the ax from the above list. So much for voting a business person in as president of the country. August 30, 2017 at 7:50 pm August 30, 2017 at 6:00 pm Apopka Critic, no offense, but get it right OK? You say Lamont Sanford is running for Orange Co. Mayor….OK, if you say so….whatever….I am not trying to be petty, but actually AC, Mrs. Demings is your US Representative, a member of Congress and not “just” your State Representative. I would not of pointed this out to you, but I’m certain Mrs. Demings’s husband, Mr. Sanford, would prefer you get all the facts correct….LOL I’m referring to your posting on your website. FEMA is 25 million $$$$$ in debt, right now, and that is before Hurricane Harvey pay out. We don’t need the border wall built right now, my opinion. August 31, 2017 at 1:33 am Mama Mia Mama Mia Mama Mia My husband said most of the town of Belle Isle was still out of power, but there was one restaurant that was open, where they ate daily, and one gas station, and everything else was closed pretty much. They had already helped clean up around Apopka and got our city squared away here, before they were sent to Belle Isle. Mama Mia August 30, 2017 at 5:15 pm Reply Oh, the life…. to be a tall, thin super model with no foot problems, and to get to prance around with high priced reptile skin stiletto heels on in a federally declared flooded disaster area, and to get to fly in on Air Force One as the cameras flash….smile and say “cheese” or make the “pout”…. None of those ugly crocs, flip- flops, or rubber boots…..oh dear me…….livin’ da life……LOL Reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The people who are posting things about why Hurricane Harvey happened and tying it to God’s wrath and as a punishment of certain people, and to politics from both sides, is getting to be a ridiculous. I saw where a visiting professor got fired for his controversial posting from his leftist viewpoint about the hurricane, and I also read Ann Coulter’s rightwing viewpoint as to why she believed Hurricane Harvey happened, and really, both sides are ridiculous! Ann Coulter was slick about what she posted, as she stated she wasn’t saying what she said, but really was. You can look it up what she said. These political comments should stop, when referring to what caused the hurricane! Those hurricane victims have enough problems without that crud. I am learning of more and more of those who have died in the floodwaters. Whole families, little kids, elderly people, a policeman trying to get to work, and others,and it is heartbreaking. The political nonsense needs to stop, but probably won’t regarding the hurricane. Now the Congress members are fighting over Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Harvey about the respective federal hurricane relief funding. Imagine being a flood victim without shelter, belongings, food, a job, flood insurance, and possibly the loss of your vehicles, and to have children to provide for, and have to listen to that crud going on between the Congress members, while you wait it out hoping for help. So ridiculous. Reply August 30, 2017 at 11:39 pm Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Surely President Trump wouldn’t cause a US government shutdown, if he doesn’t get approval for funding for his border wall, would he??????? August 30, 2017 at 4:34 pm Reply Reply Reply Reply Mama Mia If the gas prices continue to rise, you can be sure that prices will rise on most everything else. I have noticed many items are increasing already in price. Some items at the mini stores and some food items on the menu at the fast food restaurants. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment! My husband was sent with a city crew over to Belle Isle, Florida back in 2004. I believe that was the year. It was for one whole week, to help clear the streets over there in that city from the huge mess that was caused by the hurricane, or maybe it was hurricanes, as there were more than one of them during 2004. So many hurricanes, I get confused which ones, I sat through alone. The city crew took a whole bunch of chain saws and other equipment with them, and had to work non-stop cutting huge oak trees, and I mean massive oaks into pieces, and then used the front end loader, and pushed the tree debris off to the sides of the streets, just to clear the way, and left the rest for them to do. He said it was the biggest mess ever, and he carried on about the size of the giant oaks, and how big they were around, and how many chain saw blades they went through. Each member of the city crew got a nice plaque of appreciation presented to them, as well as got paid, and got their meals paid for also. My husband’s plaque is packed away somewhere here at our house. Cities should help out one another in disasters like hurricanes. August 31, 2017 at 12:00 am Reply Reply Reply Mama Mia Good night, sleep tight. Mama Mialast_img read more