Koka House / Hearth Architects

first_img Houses Save this picture!© Yuta Yamada+ 13Curated by Hana Abdel Share Architects: Hearth Architects Area Area of this architecture project CopyAbout this officeHearth ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesInterior DesignResidential InteriorsHouse InteriorsOn FacebookJapanPublished on April 16, 2020Cite: “Koka House / Hearth Architects” 15 Apr 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogBathroom AccessorieshansgroheBath & Shower ThermostatsGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ NaturalPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Mirage®WindowsVitrocsaSliding Window – Mosquito NetSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Verge LVG-SeriesMetal PanelsTrimoQbiss One in Equinix Data CentreSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Q-ClassMetal PanelsLongboard®Aluminum Battens – Link & Lock – 4″Sports ApplicationsPunto DesignPunto Fit in Ekaterinburg Public SpaceWoodBlumer LehmannFree Form Structures for Wood ProjectsKnobsKarcher DesignDoor Knob K390 (50)TablesVitsœ621 Side TableMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?Koka 住宅咖啡店 / Hearth Architects是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Koka House / Hearth Architects Koka House / Hearth ArchitectsSave this projectSaveKoka House / Hearth Architects Photographs ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/937540/koka-house-hearth-architects Clipboard 2019 Projects CopyHouses, Houses Interiors•Japan Area:  105 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Japan Year:  ArchDaily Photographs:  Yuta YamadaArchitect In Charge:Yoshitaka KugaDesign Team:Hearth ArchitectsCountry:JapanMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Yuta YamadaRecommended ProductsWindowsOTTOSTUMM | MOGSWindow Systems – BronzoFinestra B40MetallicsKriskadecorMetal Fabric – Outdoor CladdingDoorsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Sliding Door – Rabel 62 Slim Super ThermalWoodSculptformTimber Click-on BattensText description provided by the architects. The house is located at the end of T junction and surrounded by roads on three sides. The client wants to open a small coffee shop in the future. So, I made two delta roofs like a coffee shop in a mountain hut. One space is for private and the another is for half public. I connected the two spaces gently.Save this picture!© Yuta YamadaSave this picture!Arrangement PlanSave this picture!© Yuta YamadaThere’re an open kitchen which the client can use for a coffee shop in the future and floor mold living in the first space. There’re a living , plumbing ,and living space, where the client can protect privacy. I clarified the line of flow for life. I could make a house where the client can protect privacy but where the half public space and the city are connected each other gently.Save this picture!© Yuta YamadaThe exterior appearance with two delta roofs of the house is icon in the town. The trees in the garden will grow thickly and external wall by the burned cedar will decay well. The house will blend with the street when the client open a coffee shop in the future.Save this picture!© Yuta YamadaProject gallerySee allShow lessRandom Art Space / AIR architectsSelected ProjectsAbbaye Val Notre-Dame / Atelier Pierre ThibaultSelected Projects Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/937540/koka-house-hearth-architects Clipboard “COPY” “COPY”last_img read more

Fairfax-Nine merger threatens media pluralism in Australia

first_imgAustralia is ranked 19th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. The chronic lack of journalistic pluralism is one of the reasons why it is not ranked any higher. “Fairfax’s takeover is the end of a journalistic institution in Australia. Quality journalism must not be reduced to a variable dependent on commercial and advertising imperatives. This takeover is all the more worrying for journalistic pluralism and democracy because the level of media ownership concentration in Australia is already one of the highest in the world.” February 22, 2021 Find out more Media monsters Commercial synergy has endangered journalistic independence and media pluralism in what is, to say the least, an incongruous marriage. RSF_en Kept a close secret until announced on 26 July and valued at 4 billion Australian dollars (2,5 billion euros), the merger still has to be approved by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC). “The freedom and independence of Fairfax’s journalists is clearly in danger,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “We therefore urge the ACCC to block this merger until the new entity managed by Nine has adopted the Fairfax Charter of Editorial Independence in writing, in its statutes. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is extremely concerned about pluralism and respect for editorial independence in the new Australian media conglomerate resulting from last week’s merger between the Fairfax Media newspaper chain and Nine Entertainment, a national TV network. News Aside from a loss of editorial independence, Fairfax’s journalists fear that newsrooms will be merged and many of the group’s rural and suburban publications will be closed. Although not very profitable, they have until now played a vital role in providing Australians with local news of a diverse nature. This is now permitted in Australia after the decision by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s government a few months ago to repeal 30-year-old legislation restricting simultaneous ownership of both print and broadcast media. Observers fear that the Fairfax takeover will open the way to even more ownership concentration. Nine, which will have control of the new entity, has already announced 50 million Australian dollars (32 million euros) in budget cuts, to the alarm of news staff at Fairfax’s publications. They include The Age and the Sydney Morning Herald, whose editorial freedom from political or economic interference was summed up in the slogan printed under each newspaper’s name: “Independent. Always.” Takeover There is concern about the editorial independence of The Age newspaper, one of the jewels of the Fairfax Media empire, now that it is to be run by Nine Entertainment (photos: William West / AFP). News On the one hand, Fairfax has provided quality investigative journalism via a network of representative regional print publications throughout the country since 1831, On the other, Nine is primarily a sports and entertainment broadcaster and its management is regarded as much more concerned about profits and cost-cutting than journalistic ethics. RSF condemns Facebook’s blocking of journalistic content in Australiacenter_img The Fairfax brand will disappear in the new media group, in what is a clear sign that this “marriage of reason” is an outright takeover. News AustraliaAsia – Pacific Media independence Economic pressureFreedom of expression Organisation Follow the news on Australia Receive email alerts to go further August 1, 2018 Fairfax-Nine merger threatens media pluralism in Australia Like Australia’s other media and advertisement giant, Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp, the future entity controlled by Nine will include national and regional newspapers radio, stations, traditional TV channels and online ones, and a string of news websites. Help by sharing this information News January 21, 2021 Find out more Google experiments drop Australian media from search results On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia AustraliaAsia – Pacific Media independence Economic pressureFreedom of expression November 19, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

More journalists abducted in eastern Ukraine and Crimea

first_img to go further RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan News June 7, 2021 Find out more News Reporters Without Borders is alarmed by the continuing abduction of journalists in eastern Ukraine and Crimea and urges the Russian and Ukrainian authorities and all militias active in the region to respect and protect journalists regardless of the editorial policies of the media they work for.Two journalists kidnapped and beaten in CrimeaTwo journalists with the Centre for Investigative Reporting in the Crimean capital of Simferopol, reporter Sergei Mokrushin and producer Vladlen Melnikov, were arrested at around 8 p.m. on 2 June by members of a “self-defence militia,” who took them to their headquarters, beat them, and examined the contents of their mobile phones and social network accounts.Mokrushin received repeated blows to the abdomen and lower back while Melnikov’s head was smashed against a pane of glass. The journalists said two local politicians were present while they were being beaten. The mistreatment only stopped when policemen arrived and took them away to a police station.The editor of the Centre for Investigative Reporting said the militiamen accused Mokrushin and Melnikov of “hooliganism” without offering any details. The two journalists were released during the night after questioning by the police. According to preliminary diagnoses, Mokrushin has ribcage bruising and possibly broken ribs.The Centre for Investigative Reporting is one of the few remaining independent news outlets in the region, where several media were closed following the Russian intervention. A member of the Global Investigative Journalism Network, it posts its findings on its website as well as reporting them as part of a TV programme. It also provides training in investigative journalism.Two newspaper editors kidnapped in DonetskThe editors of two regional newspapers – Aleksandr Brizh of Donbas and Leonid Lapa of Vecherny Donetsk – were kidnapped in Donetsk, in eastern Ukraine, on 2 June by anti-Kiev militiamen, who stormed into their offices and took them away.After being released later the same day, they said their separatist abductors had demanded a change in editorial policies. They refused on the grounds that, if they complied, their newspapers would be “breaking Ukrainian law,” which penalizes inciting separatism, and said that, instead, they would stop working into further notice.Vecherny Donetsk belongs to Rinat Akhmetov, an oligarch who is very influential in the region and who recently announced his support for the government in Kiev against the separatists of the “People’s Republic of Donetsk.”Myroslav Rudenko, one of the separatist leaders, said the two editors were abducted in reaction to the publication in recent weeks of special dossiers paid for by Akhmetov, “each page of which denigrated the People’s Republic of Donetsk and the people’s choice.”Dmytro Litvinenko, a journalist with the Ukrainian TV station STB, reported on 2 June that he was detained at a “People’s Republic of Donetsk” checkpoint for 12 hours on 29 May. The rebels examined his equipment and did not like the tone of his SMS messages and his recent reporting on the Donbas Battalion (a pro-Kiev militia).Litvinenko, his cameraman and their driver were tied up and beaten, and then taken with bags over their heads to the main SBU building in Donetsk, where the head of the separatist unit ordered their release as soon as he learned of their detention.Citizen-journalist still missing There is still no word of Artem Laryonov, an anti-Kiev citizen-journalist who was reported missing on 10 May. Ever since the start of the unrest in eastern Ukraine in March, he had been filming the activities of the rebels and the effects of the fighting, and posting his videos on Ustream and YouTube.According to two friends, he was seen for the last time at a Ukrainian army checkpoint between the eastern cities of Sloviansk and Kramatorsk. The Ukrainian authorities say they known nothing of his whereabouts. Reporters Without Borders is very concerned about Laryonov and urges anyone holding him to provide information about his current situation and state of health.Follow the Reporters Without Borders news feed on the main media freedom violations in Ukraine.(Photos: Viktor Drachev / AFP, AFP Photo / Artem Larionov family archive) News Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts UkraineEurope – Central AsiaRussia June 4, 2014 – Updated on February 27, 2017 More journalists abducted in eastern Ukraine and Crimea center_img RSF_en UkraineEurope – Central AsiaRussia News Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia Organisation Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says June 4, 2021 Find out more June 8, 2021 Find out more “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF sayslast_img read more

Panther Paws has strong showing

first_img A poster in Permian’s Panther Paws dance studio reads “You earn your trophies at practice, you pick them up at competition” as they practice for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre. Panther Paws varsity made finals in all 5 routines and ended up receiving Overall National Champions in both Team Hip-hop and Team Open at the Crowd Pleasers Dance national showcase. They also received numerous awards from the competition including National Champions in the medium team division for Team Open, Team Pom, Team Contemporary, 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip-hop and placed 2nd overall in the medium team division. The JV team also received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip-hop, Team Contemporary and Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. Permian’s Emily Hill and Claire Hill won the National Champion Duet performed.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American) Facebook 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Nimitz Middle School Home Education ECISD Panther Paws has strong showing Permian’s Panther Paws seniors Kaycee Elrod, right, and Makayla Madrid practices for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre. Panther Paws varsity made finals in all 5 routines and ended up receiving Overall National Champions in both Team Hip-hop and Team Open at the Crowd Pleasers Dance national showcase. They also received numerous awards from the competition including National Champions in the medium team division for Team Open, Team Pom, Team Contemporary, 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip-hop and placed 2nd overall in the medium team division. The JV team also received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip-hop, Team Contemporary and Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. Permian’s Emily Hill and Claire Hill won the National Champion Duet performed.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American) 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Crockett Middle School 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Ector College Prep Success Academy WhatsApp 1 of 11 Permian’s Panther Paws’ junior Maddie Ramirez and Senior Claire Hill practices for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre. Panther Paws varsity made finals in all 5 routines and ended up receiving Overall National Champions in both Team Hip-hop and Team Open at the Crowd Pleasers Dance national showcase. They also received numerous awards from the competition including National Champions in the medium team division for Team Open, Team Pom, Team Contemporary, 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip-hop and placed 2nd overall in the medium team division. The JV team also received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip-hop, Team Contemporary and Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. Permian’s Emily Hill and Claire Hill won the National Champion Duet performed.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American) Going against some of the top teams in Texas, the Permian High School Panther Paws made a strong showing in the recent Crowd Pleasers event in Galveston.Permian’s Panther Paws practices for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American)The competition was held March 26, 27 and 28.Coach Kristin Carter said their solos went on March 25.The Panther Paws earned Overall National Champions in Team Hip hop and Team Open; received National Champions in the Medium Team division for Team Open, Team Pom and Team Contemporary; 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip hop; and placed 2nd overall in the Medium Team division. The junior varsity team received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip hop and Team Contemporary, plus Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. PHS also had a National Champion Duet performed by Claire Hill and Emily Hill. Emily Hill was also solo finalist and was awarded 5th runner-up out of 50-plus solos, the district newsletter said.Having made the finals in all five routines, Panther Paws competed against everybody, regardless of size.“We were going up against teams with like 60 and 70 girls and we only have 21,” Carter said. “We ended up winning overall national champions in hip hop and in our open category, so we have some really fun banners that we get to hang up on our walls.In the solo finalist contest, there were 50 girls and Emily Hill got fifth runner up.“Her and her twin sister (Claire) … they won national champion duet. They did this really sweet dance about moving on because they’re both going to college next year,” Carter said.Last year got year was cut short because of COVID, so getting to go to this competition and finish what they started two years ago was gratifying.“Some of the routines we reused from last year and some were brand new, but it was such an incredible experience and the girls did amazing and we had a ton of fun representing,” Carter said.Permian’s Panther Paws’ junior Maddie Ramirez, center, practices for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American)This year, she said Panther Paws was one of the strongest teams she’s had the privilege of coaching.“I would say just the differences is we had taken a two-year break from competing, so it’s kind of like having to get your feet wet again. It was cool that we had two days because day 1 they were amazing. They were on fire, but day 2 they were hungry. They wanted to win …,” Carter said.“… We won two of our routines. It was … a really big deal to win that overall division in a style division is what they call it. I think we figured out there were about 20 teams that competed in this out of all the size divisions,” she added.On a recent Monday, the team was practicing for Black Magic April 29, 30 and May 1.Team Captain Emily Hill, an 18-year-old senior, has been in Panther Paws for four years.Permian’s Panther Paws’s Emily Hill, left, and sophomore Corey McCabe practice for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American)“… We felt really good about all of our performances and we were happy with how all of them went and so we were really happy leaving, especially since we got that hip hop title. We had never won overall hip hop before, so it was really cool to make history with this team.”Hill said she and her twin, Claire, performed a lot of duets when they were younger, but then they got busy and they didn’t perform as many.“We knew we wanted to do one our senior year and so it was really special getting to dance with her again, especially taking home first. …,” Emily Hill said.solo award: it was really cool specially going in Kallan Grewell, a 17-year-old senior, also is in her fourth year in Panther Paws.“I felt really good about what we accomplished. We came together as a team even stronger. We, of course, went to compete and try to win but … we grew as a team. Every time we competed, we did even better on the floor. We felt confident and proud of one another. It was just a really good feeling,” Grewell said. Permian’s Panther Paws’s Emily Hill, left, and sophomore Corey McCabe practice for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre. Panther Paws varsity made finals in all 5 routines and ended up receiving Overall National Champions in both Team Hip-hop and Team Open at the Crowd Pleasers Dance national showcase. They also received numerous awards from the competition including National Champions in the medium team division for Team Open, Team Pom, Team Contemporary, 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip-hop and placed 2nd overall in the medium team division. The JV team also received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip-hop, Team Contemporary and Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. Permian’s Emily Hill and Claire Hill won the National Champion Duet performed.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American) Permian’s Panther Paws practices for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre. Panther Paws varsity made finals in all 5 routines and ended up receiving Overall National Champions in both Team Hip-hop and Team Open at the Crowd Pleasers Dance national showcase. They also received numerous awards from the competition including National Champions in the medium team division for Team Open, Team Pom, Team Contemporary, 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip-hop and placed 2nd overall in the medium team division. The JV team also received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip-hop, Team Contemporary and Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. Permian’s Emily Hill and Claire Hill won the National Champion Duet performed.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American) WhatsApp Twitter Permian’s Panther Paws seniors Emily Hill, Clair Hill and sophomore Corey McCabe perform a cartwheel during practice for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre. Panther Paws varsity made finals in all 5 routines and ended up receiving Overall National Champions in both Team Hip-hop and Team Open at the Crowd Pleasers Dance national showcase. They also received numerous awards from the competition including National Champions in the medium team division for Team Open, Team Pom, Team Contemporary, 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip-hop and placed 2nd overall in the medium team division. The JV team also received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip-hop, Team Contemporary and Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. Permian’s Emily Hill and Claire Hill won the National Champion Duet performed.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American)center_img Permian’s Panther Paws instructor Kristin Carter helps her teampractices for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre. Panther Paws varsity made finals in all 5 routines and ended up receiving Overall National Champions in both Team Hip-hop and Team Open at the Crowd Pleasers Dance national showcase. They also received numerous awards from the competition including National Champions in the medium team division for Team Open, Team Pom, Team Contemporary, 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip-hop and placed 2nd overall in the medium team division. The JV team also received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip-hop, Team Contemporary and Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. Permian’s Emily Hill and Claire Hill won the National Champion Duet performed.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American) Permian’s Panther Paws’ junior Maddie Ramirez, center, practices for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre. Panther Paws varsity made finals in all 5 routines and ended up receiving Overall National Champions in both Team Hip-hop and Team Open at the Crowd Pleasers Dance national showcase. They also received numerous awards from the competition including National Champions in the medium team division for Team Open, Team Pom, Team Contemporary, 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip-hop and placed 2nd overall in the medium team division. The JV team also received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip-hop, Team Contemporary and Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. Permian’s Emily Hill and Claire Hill won the National Champion Duet performed.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American) By Odessa American – April 19, 2021 Twitter Permian’s Panther Paws seniors Emily Hill, Clair Hill and sophomore Corey McCabe perform a cartwheel during practice for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre. Panther Paws varsity made finals in all 5 routines and ended up receiving Overall National Champions in both Team Hip-hop and Team Open at the Crowd Pleasers Dance national showcase. They also received numerous awards from the competition including National Champions in the medium team division for Team Open, Team Pom, Team Contemporary, 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip-hop and placed 2nd overall in the medium team division. The JV team also received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip-hop, Team Contemporary and Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. Permian’s Emily Hill and Claire Hill won the National Champion Duet performed.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American) Permian’s Panther Paws instructor Kristin Carter helps her team practices for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre. Panther Paws varsity made finals in all 5 routines and ended up receiving Overall National Champions in both Team Hip-hop and Team Open at the Crowd Pleasers Dance national showcase. They also received numerous awards from the competition including National Champions in the medium team division for Team Open, Team Pom, Team Contemporary, 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip-hop and placed 2nd overall in the medium team division. The JV team also received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip-hop, Team Contemporary and Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. Permian’s Emily Hill and Claire Hill won the National Champion Duet performed.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American) EducationECISD Panther Paws has strong showing Pinterest Facebook Previous articleHarmony Public Schools hosting virtual job fairNext articleTeenager charged with pointing shotgun at passing vehicle Odessa American RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Permian’s Panther Paws’ sophomore Corey McCabe practices for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre. Panther Paws varsity made finals in all 5 routines and ended up receiving Overall National Champions in both Team Hip-hop and Team Open at the Crowd Pleasers Dance national showcase. They also received numerous awards from the competition including National Champions in the medium team division for Team Open, Team Pom, Team Contemporary, 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip-hop and placed 2nd overall in the medium team division. The JV team also received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip-hop, Team Contemporary and Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. Permian’s Emily Hill and Claire Hill won the National Champion Duet performed.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American) Pinterest Permian’s Panther Paws instructor Kristin Carter helps her team practices for the Black Magic Mojo Show Monday, April 5, in the Panther Paws’ dance studio. Black Magic Mojo Show themed Happy Ever After which will show at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 and April 30, and at 1 p.m. on May 1 at the Ector Theatre. Panther Paws varsity made finals in all 5 routines and ended up receiving Overall National Champions in both Team Hip-hop and Team Open at the Crowd Pleasers Dance national showcase. They also received numerous awards from the competition including National Champions in the medium team division for Team Open, Team Pom, Team Contemporary, 1st runner-up in Team Jazz and Team Hip-hop and placed 2nd overall in the medium team division. The JV team also received Nationals Champions in Team Jazz, Team Hip-hop, Team Contemporary and Overall National Champions in the Junior Varsity division. Permian’s Emily Hill and Claire Hill won the National Champion Duet performed.(Jacob Ford | Odessa American) Foolproof Roasted Pork TenderloinFruit Salad to Die ForSouthern Style Potato SaladPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay last_img read more

Deputy Joe McHugh says there is no guarantee over Carn hospital

first_img Previous articleD-day for North west Fleadh bidNext articleDerry to host All-Ireland Fleadh in 2013 News Highland Deputy Joe McHugh says there is no guarantee over Carn hospital By News Highland – January 28, 2012 WhatsApp Google+ HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week Facebook Pinterest Fine Gael Deputy Joe McHugh says that while their can be no guarantee given that Carndonagh Community Hospital won’t close, it is essential that it remains open.Over 400 people packed the Colgan Hall in Carndonagh last night over fears that the facility faces closure.The facility has 30 patients and recently had its number of beds reduced – It is argued that the hospital provides key services for locals and eases pressure on Letterkenny General Hospital as it provides a step down service.That is a view shared by Deputy Joe McHugh:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/joerawcarn.mp3[/podcast] Twitter Pinterest Google+center_img Newsx Adverts Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry WhatsApp 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Facebook PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal last_img read more

University of Texas at Austin suspends Texas Cowboys for 6 years over alleged hazing

first_imgTim Warner/Getty Images FILE(AUSTIN, Texas) — The University of Texas at Austin has suspended the Texas Cowboys spirit group from campus for six years following an investigation into alleged hazing during a retreat last fall, the night before a new member was injured in a car accident and later died from his injuries.The university’s Office of the Dean of Students handed down the six-year suspension to the registered student organization on Wednesday, along with two years of probation after reinstatement and other sanctions, according to a discipline report obtained by ABC News.The Texas Cowboys, a decades-old honorary men’s service and spirit organization at the University of Texas at Austin, known for firing a cannon at home football games, has the option to accept the sanctions, appeal the decision or request a formal hearing before a “university hearing officer,” according to the report. The organization’s board of directors did not respond to ABC News’ requests for comment.“The organization still has an opportunity to appeal, and the case will be judged on its facts,” the university’s president, Gregory Fenves, said in a statement Thursday. “Let me make clear — there is no place for hazing at the University of Texas.”School officials conducted an investigation and ultimately found, “by a preponderance of evidence,” that new members of the Texas Cowboys were subjected to “multiple forms of hazing, including physical brutality, physical activity, forced ingestion of unwanted substances, coerced consumption of alcohol and degradation” during the new member retreat on the night of Sept. 29, 2018, according to the report.The following morning, several Texas Cowboys members were involved in a car accident while driving back to Austin. A new member, Nicholas Cumberland, was injured in the crash and died from his injuries a month later.“His death was a tragedy felt throughout the university community,” Fenves said. “More than anything, it was an unimaginable loss for his parents, family and friends.”Cumberland’s family contacted the University of Texas at Austin in mid-November to raise concerns they had regarding the student organization and the recent off-campus retreat, prompting the investigation. Cumberland, 21, was in the fall semester of his junior year when he joined the Texas Cowboys.His family provided school officials with group text messages obtained from his phone and a shopping list of items new members were apparently instructed to bring to the retreat location, which is referred to as the “ranch,” including a live chicken, live hamster, gallons of milk, bottles of hot sauce, large quantities of food, tobacco and copious amounts of alcohol, according to the report.The Cumberland family told school officials several members of the Texas Cowboys informed them of hazing activities that took place at the retreat the night of Sept. 29 and continued into the early morning hours of Sept. 30, the report states.School officials subsequently conducted interviews with dozens of university students who were listed as new and active members of the organization, including three students named by the Cumberland family, according to the report.During the interviews, members stated they were forced or coerced to chug a gallon of milk and consume cat food, spam, hot sauce, minced garlic and whole onions. Members, including several under the legal drinking age, were also forced or coerced to drink alcohol, including “finishing a bag of wine and shotgunning beers,” according to the report.Members were allegedly subjected to various physical activities, including playing football and doing the so-called Oklahoma drill during the game, as well as going into the cannon’s trailer and being dropped off a distance away from the off-campus retreat site to find their way back together.They additionally said they participated in relay races, barrel rolls, bear crawls and human wheelbarrow races and worked on throwing football passes to hit people with accuracy, according to the report. Members stated they were subjected to degradation, including having chips and mustard poured on their shirts before competing in the relay race, according to the report.One new member was coerced into “biting the head off a live hamster” at the retreat, which members stated has been a tradition of the Texas Cowboys initiation process for years, according to the report.Meanwhile, per the report, active members who were also in fraternities branched off separately during the retreat and engaged in hazing behavior directed at their own fraternity brothers who were new to the Texas Cowboys, including beating them with a wooden stick or a paddle.The Cumberland family told school officials they were informed their son, who was an active member in the Kappa Sigma fraternity chapter at the University of Texas at Austin, was paddled during the Texas Cowboys retreat and still had “significant, specific bruising on his buttocks nearly a month after the retreat and car accident,” according to the report.A representative from Kappa Sigma’s national headquarters did not respond to ABC News’ requests for comment.In October, the Texas Cowboys Alumni Association launched an internal investigation into the student organization that apparently centered around the retreat and the subsequent car accident. The alumni association told officials at the University of Texas at Austin it had reprimanded or expelled several members as a result of the probe, according to the report.The overall plan was to leave the retreat location in the early morning and head back to campus, according to the report, which said several members confirmed they had a sober driver and that none of the members reported being prevented from sleeping during the retreat.The schools says that the conduct detailed in the report violates university policies barring hazing, harmful behavior and alcohol misconduct. In addition to the six-year suspension and two-year probationary period, the university’s Office of the Dean of Students has permanently prohibited the Texas Cowboys from having separate student organization sub-groups and from using live animals for events or other purposes.All incoming new member classes of the Texas Cowboys will be required to complete an alcohol education program through the university and must read the book “The Cowboy’s Secret” about Gave Higgins, a University of Texas at Austin student who died at his Texas Cowboys new member retreat in 1995.Each new member will also be required to write a two-page reflection paper on the book that must be approved by the organization’s adviser and sent to the university’s Office of the Dean of Students, according to the report.“Based on the totality of circumstances, even if the car accident had not occurred, it is important to note that the Texas Cowboys’ behavior at the retreat, and at the other specific occasions discovered in the course of this investigation, does in fact meet the institutional definition of hazing,” the report stated.“However, as with many accidents, the car accident that led to Nicholas Cumberland’s death could have been avoided had there been adequate risk management practices in place, such as providing transportation to all members and choosing a safer location, closer to campus.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Letters

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. LettersOn 1 Oct 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. This week’s lettersProfit/enterprise ratios would flag up innovation Innovative solutions are required to tackle issues raised by the article ‘HRheld back by inability to measure human capital’ (News, 24 September). One option might be to develop profit/enterprise ratios (P/E). These wouldshow the proportion of profits derived from new ideas and processes. Thisdirectly relates to the input of individual employees and therefore indicatesthe efficacy of recruitment, training and reward strategies in boosting thebottom line. While not an exact science, a first shot at arriving at a P/E might be to allocateprofit made over a set period to different generations of product innovationsand ideas. Each £1m of continuing profit could be divided between products or servicesin place for more than 10 years, 5 to 10 years, 3 to 5 years, and less than 3years. The idea is to favour profit derived from recent innovations and discountcash cows. Profits from business processes in existence for more than 10 yearsare divided in half, while profits from newer innovations are multiplied.Profits derived from processes in place between 5 and 10 years remain neutral.These figures are totalled and set in ratio to the total profit. While all business leaders recognise the importance of promoting innovation,few have been as quick to realise the importance of HR strategy. It is up to usto demonstrate the connection. Prof. Alec Reed, CBE Chairman, Reed Executive Move is wake up call for the UK Instead of being so willing to transfer call centre jobs to the other sideof the world, perhaps we would be better off concentrating upon improving thelot of our existing UK employees (Analysis, 17 September). The article claims that ‘training and motivation is better in India’, yetthese are issues which can be influenced through better training, increasedinvolvement and setting high service standards in the UK. UK call centres are not all the same – in our centre we deliver eight weekstraining for all new starts and have made improvements that have led todramatic reductions in absence and turnover figures. It is all about betterpeople management and creating an environment where people want to work. Let us not forget this is not just about cost, it is about deliveringservice to the customer. We should not be so eager to give our jobs away toother countries. Keren Edwards HR director, Kwik-Fit Insurance Services Lost chance to gauge absence The new code of practice on employment records (News, 17 September) will bea major hindrance to our operations. We employ around 120 labouring staff each year and have a high turnover oftemporary workers. We have just installed new procedures to help combatabsenteeism. These include friendly return-to-work interviews and monthly individual andgroup discussions on workplace strengths and weaknesses. Those employees who may take advantage of the system will not signauthorisation forms for the code, and I feel the new code will hinder anyattempts to understand absenteeism. Chris Manson Personnel officer, Shetland Catch last_img read more

Research Associate – Food Science/Biochemistry

first_imgThe research associate will participate in the design,implementation, and evaluation of research studies; monitorexpenditure of research funds with PI; develop, update and revisestandard operating procedures; perform training duties; attend andparticipate in meetings, conferences and training groups; andassist in supervising student research. The position will alsoassist in the development of proposals to funding agencies; developand supervise the development of methods, techniques, andinstrumentation needed to carry out research projects and results;analyze and evaluate research results; write progress reports andfinal reports on completion of research projects; and author andco-author manuscripts for publication and/or presentation atprofessional meetings and other duties as assigned.last_img read more

Grace Potter Announces Stacked Lineup For Grand Point North Festival

first_imgGrace Potter has announced the lineup for the Grand Point North Music Festival, scheduled for September 17-18 at the Waterfront Park in Burlington, VT. The beloved annual tradition will see Potter headlining both nights, and will welcome a number of top artists for the two night run.The lineup features sets from Old Crow Medicine Show, Guster, The Wood Brothers, Kaleo, Blind Pilot, The Record Company, Kat Wright & The Indomitable Soul Band and Eliza Hardy Jones. Two day passes are currently on-sale, and single day tickets go on-sale Friday, April 22 at 11am.“I’m thrilled to be able to FINALLY announce the official lineup for my festival, Grand Point North! This year’s lineup will include hand-picked local faves, regional and national bands as well as expertly curated best-of-Vermont-Food, drink, dance, performance, art, and mayhem” said Potter in a statement. “I hope you will all join me this September for another iconic weekend in the mountains of Vermont on the Burlington Waterfront. If you’ve never been, I DARE you to come. Be prepared to fall in love. This place is pure magic.”The festival is thrown in conjunction with Higher Ground, and more information can be found here.last_img read more

Homeless, hopeless, and sick

first_img ‘To be horrified by inequality and early death and not have any kind of plan for responding — that would not work for me’ Paul Farmer on Partners In Health, ‘Harvard-Haiti,’ and making the lives of the poor the fight of his life Shipping container at Divinity School provides ‘portal’ to teens half a world away With diabetes rapidly spreading around the globe, its prevalence among refugees and others fleeing war and natural disaster has also risen. But awareness of diabetes as a medical issue humanitarian workers should be ready to deal with has lagged.That can lead to poor blood-sugar control among migrating diabetics and an unprepared medical system receiving them. That combination can be deadly for those with Type 1 diabetes — dependent on injections of insulin — and potentially debilitating for those with Type 2.Lindsay Jaacks, assistant professor of global health at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, and Sylvia Kehlenbrink, an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School and an endocrinologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, have convened a symposium to raise awareness, share experiences from the field, and begin to shape a broad strategy to address this issue.Jaacks and Kehlenbrink discussed the April 4‒5 conference, at the Martin Conference Center in Longwood, with the Gazette, outlining the global diabetes landscape and noting the importance of players on the humanitarian scene — always struggling with scarce resources — coordinating efforts to address this challenge.Q&ALindsay Jaacks and Sylvia KehlenbrinkGAZETTE: How big a problem is diabetes globally? JAACKS: It’s approaching half a billion people with diabetes globally right now. About 80 percent of those people are in low- and middle-income countries, in large part because China, India, Brazil — big countries — are low- and middle-income countries, but also because of a high prevalence in many of these countries. In India, where I do a lot of work, the prevalence of diabetes is actually quite similar to the prevalence in the U.S., which is quite shocking. In Mexico, the prevalence is more than double that in the U.S. None of these countries has a plateauing or declining rate of diabetes, so it’s only going to get worse as time goes on.GAZETTE: Is this a relatively new phenomenon? Or is this something that has been going on for a long time and we’re just becoming aware of it?JAACKS: It’s relatively new, but it depends on the country. Going back to Mexico and India, in cities — even 10 years ago — the prevalence was pretty high, especially among high-income individuals. The most recent phenomenon is this spread to rural areas. So it isn’t necessarily new for diabetes to be in these countries, but it’s new for it to be everywhere.GAZETTE: Are we expecting it to become a bigger global problem, or has it plateaued?KEHLENBRINK: Unfortunately, the projections are for a 48 percent increase in diabetes prevalence globally by year 2045, according to the International Diabetes Federation. The most dramatic increases are expected to occur in Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean regions. So, the prevalence is expected to go up everywhere in the world but by far most dramatically in low- and middle-income countries. At current estimates, it’s going to become an overwhelming issue, because even under stable conditions many of these countries are already struggling to fund and treat diabetes.GAZETTE: In the context of the symposium and humanitarian crises, those areas that you mentioned — Africa, the Eastern Mediterranean — are where a lot of refugees and displaced people are from today.KEHLENBRINK: That’s exactly right. We’re currently witnessing the highest numbers of global forced displacement on record due to conflicts, disaster, and disease outbreaks. Most recently, the crisis in Syria brought the noncommunicable disease (NCD) issue to light. In the Eastern Mediterranean region, diabetes prevalence is extremely high. So, many refugees leave their country with diabetes but humanitarian organizations are not equipped to treat it. “The projections are for a 48 percent increase in diabetes prevalence globally by year 2045. … Even under stable conditions many of these countries are already struggling to fund and treat diabetes.” — Sylvia Kehlenbrink The unsavory side of sugar The not lost generation GAZETTE: What happens to a diabetic who has been displaced and isn’t getting medicine or taking care of themselves?KEHLENBRINK: Type 1 diabetes — that’s the autoimmune-mediated type of diabetes — is a lot less prevalent than Type 2 diabetes but a lot more deadly. High blood sugars due to lack of insulin can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, which can be fatal within days or weeks if the person does not have access to insulin. So, if insulin is not available in the humanitarian responders’ medical kit, which it rarely is today, they will not survive. So this is an immediate need.If someone has Type 2 diabetes and doesn’t get their medicine for a couple of weeks or even months, they will likely survive. However, if people are displaced for years, which is the new norm — on average 20 to 27 years — and their blood sugars are high and out of control for prolonged periods, they’re at higher risk of infection, not healing from wounds, developing blindness or kidney failure. If you have Type 2 diabetes with underlying cardiovascular disease, the stress of the situation can potentially lead to an acute heart attack or a stroke, which can lead to debilitating long-term complications.Furthermore, Type 2 diabetes is occurring in younger people — 30s, 40s, 50s. Yesterday one of my colleagues at Doctors Without Borders was telling me that what has been so tragic to see in the field are young mothers with Type 2 diabetes. He’s seen quite a number who are blind from the disease and can no longer care for their children.GAZETTE: Of the 68.5 million people displaced today, do we have any idea what proportion of them might be diabetic? Is there any reason to think it would be higher or lower than the general population?KEHLENBRINK: There’s no clear data on that. That’s one of the reasons we’re convening the symposium, because the epidemiology and surveillance systems in the humanitarian arena do not routinely include noncommunicable diseases like diabetes.They’re not consistently monitoring it and it’s hard to know what to make of the data that’s out there. We published a series last week in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal on this very issue, looking at the literature on the burden of diabetes in a humanitarian context, and the data is really scarce.GAZETTE: Why aren’t humanitarian workers thinking about noncommunicable diseases? Is it more of a long-term problem and they’re focused on the immediate? Or does a traditional bias make them overlook it because it hasn’t been a problem in decades past?KEHLENBRINK: I would say all of the above. The topic has come up not infrequently over the past decade; however, organizations are confronted with competing priorities and the magnitude of the problem of diabetes and other NCDs has not been adequately recognized. I think organizations feel overwhelmed, because you have to treat NCDs regularly and you need trained staff and a system for continuity of care, which is difficult with groups of people on the move. How do you track their health needs over time? It’s not like a finite treatment course: a week with antibiotics for pneumonia.And insulin is currently expensive and the cost of care overall quite high, although I think with thoughtful systems and programs the cost ultimately can be manageable.GAZETTE: Let’s talk about the symposium itself. Where did this come from and who do you expect to attend?KEHLENBRINK: I’ve been working on diabetes in crises over the past several years. During this time, I’ve observed a number of organizations working on similar projects on this topic, but not communicating or coordinating. I thought that this was really unfortunate because there’s limited funding and few people working directly on this problem. We should complement one another and leverage each other’s strengths to move this field forward. So that’s how the idea came about.This is the first symposium on this topic. We now have about 100 people coming together, including representatives from the World Health Organization, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and Doctors Without Borders, among others.I also want to point out that this issue is relevant to the U.S. as well. Natural disasters are increasing in frequency — I’m thinking about Puerto Rico and Hurricane Maria and Hurricane Harvey, which hit Houston — so this is not just an issue in lower- and middle-income countries. This is a high-income country issue too. It’s a U.S. issue.GAZETTE: What do you hope participants leave with?JAACKS: The ultimate goal is to bring everybody together to highlight the issues, to hear people in the field share experiences, to meet one another, and then to identify — because the needs are enormous — what are the most immediate needs, possible funding sources, and who can do what.What we’re hoping to have come out of this is a “Boston Declaration” that identifies the most immediate needs and barriers to diabetes care, and ultimately to NCD care at large. This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity.center_img Related Symposium examines sweetener’s effects on human body and on public policy Face time with refugees Syrian asylees release documentary to highlight struggles of child refugees The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more